The Toyota Way of Managing

  • Presenters: Pascal Van Cauwenberghe
  • Type: Interactive presentation
  • Duration: 60
  • Audience: Those who want to know more about Lean, Lean Management, the origins of agile ideas. Those who want to attend a fun presentation. Those who want to know more about management. Those who think that building software is totally unlike building cars and like to have a spirited discussion about it.
Objectives

Learn more about:

  • What is Lean? What is the Toyota Way?
  • How is this relevant for agile software development?
  • What can we learn from "the greatest manufacturer on earth"?
Abstract

Jeffrey Liker has explained the "Toyota Way" through 14 principles. In this presentation, we go over each of the principles and see if there is any similarity or relation to agile practices.

The 14 principles deal with

  • how processes are the foundation and the memory of a company
  • how to manage to bring the best out of people (employees) and partners
  • how the practices of a learning organisation bring about continuous improvement
  • how the philosophy Toyota pervades everyone that works for them and everything they do
Many Lean ideas like "flow", "pull", "buidling quality in", "relentless reflection", "continuous improvement", "sustainable pace", "detecting errors early"... can be found in agile methods. Coincidence? I think not...

Through the experiences of the presenter in applying these principles, we explore the similarities and differences between Lean and Agile.

Benefits of participating

  • Understand where agile ideas come from, why they work
  • Learn some management techniques
  • Experience a different way to give presentations
  • Learn some cool Japanese words to impress your friends and colleagues with!
What will the organisers learn

  • How people in the audience have applied these ideas, with/without success
  • How people feel about the ideas and philosophy, if this is something than can be applied in the Benelux? I've been told that "this only works in Japan!" I don't think so, but I'd like to get the audience's point of view on this question.
Session Outline

  • 50 min presenting the Toyota Way
  • 10 min questions and closing
History