Presented by Regis Medina

Abstract:

Agile approaches have brought the customer at the center of the development process, with a team ready to adapt to its changing needs during the whole life of the project. However, this flexibility turns out to be also it's Achilles' heel: unwary teams can end un running in circles if the customer has no clear idea of what he wants, or they can pile up features up to a point where their cherished application has simply become unusable.
The key to success in this area lies today in the hands of the Product Owner. But what is a Product Owner  supposed to do? How can he select wisely among the many competing feature requests? And how can he organize the user interface so that it remains uncluttered and easy to use iteration after iteration?
In this session, Régis Medina will show how the problem solving approach used by lean practitioners can be used as a powerful guide for successfully building a product that completely resolves the problem of its customers. Value, waste, performance management, PDCA, "genchi genbutsu", lead time reduction... you'll discover how to use all these principles to build applications that delight your users!

Format and length:

60 minutes talk.

Intended audience and prerequisites:

This session is intented for product owners, agile coaches / scrum masters, managers, developers... everyone interested in how to build software to meet its users needs. There are no specific prerequisites other than having some hands-on experience with development projects.

Objective of the session:

The main idea of my session is that the software development game is not about adding features fast, it's about deeply understanding the problems that our customers face, and solving them one by one using the scientific approach - turning Deming's PDCA wheel, based on first-hand observations of how they use the software in their own context.


Benefits, for the participants and the presenters:

The participants will learn about lean's rigorous problem solving approach, and I hope they'll learn to see the role of their teams in a different light.