Room 1

Room 2

Room 3

7:00

 Early Bird Yoga session

Thien Que Nguyen &
Olivier Costa

8:00

Registration and coffee

9:00

Opening plenary

9:30

 Sketchnoting FTW!

Laurens Bonnema &
Serge Beaumont


Presentation

 Agile the Boardgame

Dajo Breddels

Max: 100 

Session materials

 Real Options: Learn When and How (NOT) to Decide

Pascal Van Cauwenberghe


Presentation and more info

10:45

Coffee Break

11:15

 The power of habit

Yves Hanoulle


Slides

 Get out of SCRUM, get into KANBAN

Sandra Warmolts

Max: 30 

Presentation

 The lonely analyst in an agile team

Thien Que Nguyen &
Merlijn van Minderhout and Olga Smirnova

Max: 30 

Workshop outputs

12:30

Lunch

13:30

Opening plenary

14:00

 Extreme Team Performance Gaming

Ron Eringa &
Rob van Lanen

Max: 30 

 Walt Disney creativity technique

Jan De Baere

 Refactoring to Hexagonal Rails

Rob Westgeest

Computer
Max: 28 

15:15

Coffee Break

15:45

Extreme Team Performance Gaming

CONTINUED

 Fail early, fail often

Marc Evers &
Hans Kalle

Max: 30 

Slides and handout

Refactoring to Hexagonal Rails

CONTINUED

17:15

Closing plenary

18:00

Drinks



Legend
Technology and Technique
Customer and Planning
Team and Individual
Process and Improvement
Other

Session descriptions

Early Bird Yoga session

Experience the body & mind connection

Thien Que Nguyen & Olivier Costa

Yoga exercises for the early birds who want to experience the body & mind connection.

No previous training needed. No special clothes required.

Goal of the session: Connect body & mind to be ready for the event
Session Type: experiential learning session

Wake up and get ready for the conference with these guided breathing and relaxation exercises.


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Sketchnoting FTW!

How to use Sketchnoting to improve communication and collaboration

Laurens Bonnema & Serge Beaumont

Sketchnoting is the use of pictures, word art and text to communicate ideas. Serge and Laurens will explain what sketchnoting is, why it's useful, how you can do it yourself, and will give you tips and tricks to get you going. They will also show how they have been using sketchnoting in their daily work, most notably Product Ownership (Serge) and envisioning by management (Laurens). And of course you will get the chance to have a go at it yourself!

Artistic skills totally not a requirement. You'll walk out of this session ready to take memorable notes that others will want to copy.

Goal of the session: The ability to express themselves with "not just words"
Intended audience: Anyone.
Expected experience: From zero to hero.
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session
Materials: Presentation

Sketchnoting is the use of pictures, word art and text to communicate ideas. Serge and Laurens will explain what sketchnoting is, why it's useful, how you can do it yourself, and will give you tips and tricks to get you going. They will also show how they have been using sketchnoting in their daily work, most notably Product Ownership (Serge) and envisioning by management (Laurens). And of course you will get the chance to have a go at it yourself!

Artistic skills totally not a requirement. You'll walk out of this session ready to take memorable notes that others will want to copy.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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max
100

Agile the Boardgame

Dajo Breddels

Most people learn more from experiences, than from lectures or books. This is the reason why we developed Agile the Board Game. This cooperative board game allows you to experience Agile projects without spending months. We use this game to introduce people to Agile software development and let them play with different choices you have to make as a real Agile team. Choices like: length of iteration, composition of the team, prioritizing what to do and when to do which best practices. We find this game also useful to teach the impact of doing Agile software development to non-IT people. After attending this session you will be able to host your own games (attendees can download the game for free).

Goal of the session:
Expected experience: experienced
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session
Materials: Session materials

People learn to play the Agile the Board Game. It’s a cooperative game (playing against the system not against each other) where a team of 5 to 9 people have to finish a project as good as possible. The game itself is a resource based game like “Settlers of Catan” or “Lords of Waterdeep”. During the game the team has to make a lot of decisions, which are also faced by real scrum teams, like: who to hire, length of iteration, priority of product backlog, to invest in best practices and of course how to use your resources.
After you attended this session, you are able to host a game with Agile the Board Game at your own organization. And let people experience some of the core principles of agile during play. All attendees will get the link to download their own copy of the game.


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Real Options: Learn When and How (NOT) to Decide

Making risky technical, project and life decisions can be fun

Pascal Van Cauwenberghe

Making decisions about technical subjects, project risks or everyday life can be stressful. How do we know we've made the right decision?

There is no way to always make the best decision. There are techniques to routinely make good decisions, without stress.

We'll tell you some stories of how we've applied Real Options and other decision techniques to difficult technical and project decisions. You may discover some simple techniques to make better decisions, starting today.

Goal of the session: Be entertained by some project fairytales See decision-making in a different way* Discover a technique that you can apply immediately
Intended audience: Anyone, even though the examples concern technical decisions
Session Type: 75 min discovery session
Materials: Presentation and more info

Projects and product development is one long series of difficult decisions. We'd like to take the right decision at the right time. Right?

How do we come to the right decision at the right time? I have no idea.

I do have a bunch of techniques that are useful to come to the best possible decision before it's too late. I'll tell you stories of how we used Real Options, set-based design and the creative process to make surprisingly good architectural decisions under difficult circumstances.

Maybe you'll reconsider how and when you make architectural and other decisions next time you're faced with a difficult situation in work or life.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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The power of habit

how creating good habit can save your project

Yves Hanoulle

For me, agile is about a mindset and a continuous improvement of everything.
To create a mindset of improving and working on ourselves, we need to have a team that gets into the habit of improving.

Goal of the session: Participants will learn how they can create or change habits in their life.
Intended audience: Jan,Marieke,Leo,Bram,Philippe,Georges,Vincent,Joke,Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: I'm good myself at creating new habits for myself
Session Type: 75 min discovery session
Materials: Slides

For me, agile is about a mindset and a continuous improvement of everything.
To create a mindset of improving and working on ourselves, we need to have a team that gets into the habit of improving.

This will be a presentation (with some small exercises)

- What is the habit loop
- The Craving Brain
- Golden rule of habit change
- the habits of successful organisations
- are we responsible for our habits?

The presentation is loosely based on the book: The power of habit. (Told by using pictures of my family, with our stories)

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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max
30

Get out of SCRUM, get into KANBAN

Experience how to change from the SCRUM board to the KANBAN board

Sandra Warmolts

Want to go from SCRUM to KANBAN, or a combination of SCRUM and KANBAN?
This session will give you hands-on tips and tricks to change ToDo/Doing/Done into multiple KANBAN columns.

You will:
1. Experience the SCRUM-sprint by implementing some user stories
2. Create the KANBAN board
3. Experience the KANBAN-period with the same user stories

What are the pros and cons? ... let's discuss!!!

Goal of the session: Have a hands-on experience how to create a KANBAN board
Intended audience: Leo, Marieke, Bram, Ellen, Philippe, Georges, Vincent, Hank
Expected experience: Basic knowledge of SCRUM and KANBAN
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session
Materials: Presentation

Your team is doing SCRUM for some time now, but you want to see and create more flow. This might be a good point to move to KANBAN, or at least to combine the two. But how do we move from "to do", "doing" and "done" to all those nice KANBAN columns.

In this session we will start with a SCRUM-board with users stories split into many tasks. Later in the session you will step-by-step transform this board with a group into a KANBAN board.
In both situations we will simulate a sprint or a 2 week period and see and feel what the differences are in flow and visualization on the SCRUM board and on the KANBAN board.

You will experience SCRUM as well as KANBAN with the same user stories and the same team.
The last part of the session is to discuss what eye-openers there were for you and what disappointments.

This session is not about KANBAN or SCRUM being better than the other. I am in favor of combining and mixing framework, so a combination of SCRUM and KANBAN works great for me.

During the session I will tell you a little about two teams who transferred from a SCRUM board to a KANBAN board, why we did it, what they like and what were the pitfalls.

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
30

The lonely analyst in an agile team

Analyze and solve your most pressing agile analysis issues

Thien Que Nguyen & Merlijn van Minderhout and Olga Smirnova

Share and really understand the issues analysts, product owners and product managers face in agile teams. Search and share solutions to some of those issues. Maybe you'll go back to work on Monday with concrete actions to solve your most pressing issues.

Goal of the session: Share some of the most common impediments and issues analysts, product managers and product owners encounter in agile teams. Find some solutions. Maybe go away with concrete actions to solved your impediment on Monday.
Intended audience: Marieke, Georges, Joke, Ellen
Expected experience: Some experience as analyst, product owner or product manager in an agile team. Or you have worked with one or more people in one of these roles in an agile team.
Session Type: 75 min discovery session
Materials: Workshop outputs

Working as an analyst, product manager or product owner in an agile team is not always easy:

  • The whole way of working is different than what I'm used to!
  • The team has a voracious appetite for stories and information. I can't keep up!
  • The team wants everything cut into teensy tiny bits. How do I make requirement carpaccio? How do I keep the overall view?
  • <Your problem here>

Join us in this workshop to share your most pressing agile analysis and product management issues and apply business analysis techniques to really understand those issues.

Maybe you'll discover some ideas to solve some of these issues. Maybe you'll be impatient for Monday to come so that you can implement the concrete actions to tackle your most pressing issue.

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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max
30

Extreme Team Performance Gaming

How to facilitate constructive personal feedback sessions using card games

Ron Eringa & Rob van Lanen

Learn how to facilitate constructive personal feedback sessions with your team.
Discover if your self image is reflected by how your team members look at you.
Learn how to facilitate your team to self organize by giving them a tool for managing conflict, increasing team integrity & coordinate inter-team behavior.
Discover why communication sessions sometimes are difficult in certain situations and how you can improve communication within your team.

We will talk about how this approach is different with traditional feedback mechanisms and we will show you how to applying the game in your own environment.

Goal of the session: Discover each other strengths & weaknesses. Learn how to turn weaknesses into strengths.
Intended audience: Anyone who wants to improve their team synergy
Expected experience: None required. Anyone can join
Session Type: 150 min experiential learning session

Real self organizing team continuously improve their team performance.

One way to to improve team performance is to arrange personal feedback sessions on a regular basis. However, giving each other personal feedback is not always easy. You need to be constructive without bringing up too much emotions.

In this session we will explore a number of ways to facilitate constructive personal feedback sessions with your team. We will use card games that are based on the 'Core Quadrant' model by Daniel Ofman (http://www.scienceprogress.info/effectiveness/core-quadrant-ofman).

Participants will be sharing their personal core qualities, pitfalls, challenges & allergies in a card and game. We will discover how our pitfalls and allergies are related to our core qualities and this affects the behavior and effectiveness of a team.

Besides giving other team members feedback you will also learn how to introspect yourself. You will learn how a team can use this to grow and become more effective in their day to day work.

Since the theory behind the game is very easy to explain we have lots of time to actually play discuss and discover team dynamics. We can even analyze some conflict situations that participants bring to the stage and we will explain how we used the game in our own environment.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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Walt Disney creativity technique

How to develop high quality idea's and get the plan to execute

Jan De Baere

As Agilists we value iterations so why not use them to develop and refine idea's and plans? If you want a high level solution for your business, technical or other issue you can use the proven method used and developed by Walt Disney himself. The technique gets you to create idea's, make the plans to realize them and is designed to deliver the highest quality possible. It's iterative, frustrating (sorry) and fun. Perfect match for Agile projects.

Goal of the session: Apply the technique/strategy Walt Disney used to create maybe the most creative company in the world
Intended audience: people interest in the creativity process of Walt Disney
Expected experience: none
Session Type: 75 min discovery session

Walt Disney was a high school dropout who suffered several business disasters and bankruptcy. He overcame his personal and financial challenges by using his imagination to create an entertainment empire that has touched the hearts, minds and emotions of all of us.

He summarized his creativity in one word: Imagineering. The term “Imagineering” combines the words imagination and engineering. Imagineering enabled him to transform the dreams, fantasies and wishes from his imagination into concrete reality.

Disney’s thinking strategy involved exploring something using three different perceptual positions. An insight into these positions comes from the comment made by one of his animators that:

“…there were actually three different Walts: the dreamer, the realist, and the spoiler (critic). You never knew which one was coming into your meeting.”

The technique could be used when you want to develop a new idea or elaborate upon an exciting one. This is done by freely dreaming in the first phase. In a second phase you become practical and work out the idea. In a third phase we become the critics, not the ideas are criticized but the practical implementation. Despite what you would think this is where most people have trouble as we are thought not to be negative. After that we can start dreaming again! The art is to split up the "mindsets".

A workshop where we learn and apply the technique used by Walt Disney to create what maybe is the most creative company in the world.


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max
28

Portable computer

Refactoring to Hexagonal Rails

Refactoring your Rails Applications to the passive controller style

Rob Westgeest

You've heard the buzz about hexagonal architectures, but applying those ideas on your existing Rails code just seems like too big a mountain to climb.

Goal of the session: To learn to apply hexagonal architecture to rails applications.
Intended audience: Bram, Jan, Leo, Philippe
Expected experience: Some experience with software development, Rails or Ruby experience helps, but this will even be fun if you never have programmed in rails (or ruby) before.
Session Type: 150 min experiential learning session

You've heard the buzz about hexagonal architectures, but applying those ideas on your existing Rails code just seems like too big a mountain to climb.
Not any more! In this session, you'll take an example of a classic Rails controller and, guided by Rob and Lars, refactor it to the passive controller pattern. As we go, we'll peel all our business logic away from the framework and isolate it into plain old Ruby objects that are fast to test. We'll finish with a show and tell where we share and reflect on what we've learned during the session.

We have ideas and some practice, yet we do not know all the answers. We expect to learn from this session as well. We see this session as an experiential learning session. We'll capture and publish new ideas and insights.

Although you will get the most from this session if you are experienced in Rails (when you have felt the pain) but what you will learn in this session is more generic and applies to any MVC web framework you might have worked on before.

This session is originally Matt Wynne's. He presented this on GOTO; Amsterdam, where Lars and Rob hosted his session. As Matt cannot make it to XPDays, he kindly gave us permission to submit this for XPDays Benelux.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe

Back to program

max
30

Fail early, fail often

Establishing a culture of experimentation - you aren't learning if you aren't failing

Marc Evers & Hans Kalle

Agile has made us realize development is a complex process where you can't know everything up front; you need to use feedback, work iteratively, apply, inspect & adapt. Recent developments like the Cynefin Framework and Real Options take this a step further. In this session you will learn why & how to run multiple safe to fail experiments in parallel, and move towards a culture of experimentation and learning.

Goal of the session: Learn how to establish a learning culture in your organisation by running safe to fail experiments
Intended audience: managers, team leads, product managers, product owners, architects, scrum masters (Leo, Bram, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen)
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session
Materials: Slides and handout

One of the things agile brought us is the insight that software development (and product development for that matter) is mostly a complex problem. We continuously have to make decisions - on products, features, priorities, architecture, design, technical debt - that lie in the complex domain. We cannot find a good let alone the best solution in advance, regardless of how much analysis and expertise we throw in. Only after the fact we know the quality of our decisions (and even that knowledge won't help us much for future decisions).

Agile development and frameworks like Scrum try to tackle this by working in short iterations and applying feedback at many levels - apply, inspect & adapt.

Working iteratively towards a moving goal is a first step. Recent developments like Cynefin and Real Options offer new insights and approaches for navigating through complex problems like product development: run multiple safe-to-fail experiments or probes in parallel. Running small experiments (some of which will fail) will help you rapidly learn and see what direction to take. Running many parallel experiments might seem costly, however, taking many small bets will pay off much better than putting all your eggs in one basket by taking decisions without a clue (you might be lucky but gambling is no way to run a business).

An example of a small experiment is to do a time boxed spike in which one tries to implement one of the proposed software designs. Or a team could implement two design candidates in parallel for some time in order to know which one works best.

In this session we will focus on safe to fail experiments: how do you define and manage them? This session is hands on - in small groups, you will work on defining & proposing possible experiments for a project or product you bring in. Your proposal will be scrutinized by other groups so that you'll return to work with some experiments ready to run.

We'll mix elements of the Cynefin sensemaking framework, Don Reinertsen's Principles of Product Development Flow and Dan Mezick's The Culture Game.

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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Presenters

Thien Que Nguyen

Did you ever encounter teams having difficulty working together?
Or did you ever experience a company where no one knows the whole process, only bits and pieces?
Or is your team working day and night and still nothing gets done?

I help teams to create serious improvement by using LEAN values/thinking, playing system thinking games, by making bottlenecks visible, but mostly by letting people experience the issues.

One team reduced their lead time from 5 weeks to 5 working days. Another team regained their creativity and fun. And this gave them back their control to change their work in small visible steps.


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Olivier Costa

Website: http://www.aegisoft.be

Olivier Costa

is a member of Ken Gyu dojo where he learns Aikido from Frank sensei and his teacher Tomita Shihan a Japanese grand-master and student of the founder of Aikido: Morihei Ueshiba.
www.WareNatuur.be

He has always been involved in the whole software development cycle. From (business) idea over development & testing until release, follow up (business satisfaction) and maintenance. While writing code primarily in C#, he became an Agile Coach (for very diverse teams writing in very diverse languages) in search of a team he wants to work in.

My top 2 favorite books are:


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Laurens Bonnema

By day, Laurens works as an Agile coach and trainer with Xebia to help organizations transform to Agile. By night, he is Treasurer of Agile Holland, co-organizer of Agile Coach Camp Netherlands, and member of the Agile Consortium's Agile Certification workgroup.

Laurens strives to merge classic and Agile management in the conviction that it is the future of professional management. He is an experienced, and sometimes even celebrated, public speaker. His XP Days presentation on the Political Economy of Agile Projects even started with applause!

Laurens lives in Dordrecht, The Netherlands, with his wife Nienke Blauw and son Mark.


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Serge Beaumont

He's like... super cool!


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Dajo Breddels

Website: http://www.kuzidi.com/whykuzidi/team/dajo-breddels/

Twitter: @dajobreddels

Dajo Breddels, Agile Coach with a big interest in developing new playful and creative ways to give insights and help in cultural transformation.


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Pascal Van Cauwenberghe

Pascal Van Cauwenberghe

Website: http://blog.nayima.be

Twitter: @pascalvc

Pascal Van Cauwenberghe is a consultant based in Brussels who tries to solve more problems than he creates. To do this, he uses Agile, Lean, Theory of Constraints and Systems Thinking techniques.

He’s one of the founders of the Belgian XP group and one of the organizers of XP Days Benelux. One day he and Vera Peeters invented the “XP Game“, because they couldn’t explain XP to their team and customers. They’ve learned that games are an ideal way to learn. Since then he tries to transform work into play…


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Yves Hanoulle

Twitter: @YvesHanoulle

I worked as software support, developer, team lead, trainer, agile coach, change artist, first follower, thought jockey. These days I call myself Creative Collaboration Agent.

I believe that IT is mainly about working with people.
A skill that can never be learned enough.

Team startups & retrospectives are my favorite ways to help your team(s).

y


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Sandra Warmolts

Sandra Warmolts

Twitter: @sannygr

Agile project leader, SCRUM master, Lean Agile coach, Agile trainer

Sandra Warmolts has been in Software Development for over 20 years. 11 years ago she got involved with Agile and stuck to it.
The commitment, openness, teamwork and collaboration between teams and business just suits very well.
She loves working with teams and they seem to like to work with her. She teaches them how being Agile can make their work so much fun and have a happy customer as well.
She's working with teams doing SCRUM, KANBAN, RUP, prince2, mixed and matched.
When she's not working, she a mom for her two kids, 10 and 9 years, and a lovely wife ;-). She likes to play tennis, do fitness and go out for dinner.


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Merlijn van Minderhout

Merlijn is an independent all-round IT consultant with experience in industry and financial environments. He participated in a wide range of projects in different roles covering all aspects of the software development lifecycle. He strongly believes that people, communication and continuous improvement are key factors in building high performance teams. He adopted agile processes and practices several years ago as they enable team collaboration and delivering efficient high quality results.


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Olga Smirnova

Olga has a background in international communication and conference interpreting.

Her first contact with Information Technologies dates back to 2005 when she was teaching "English for Computer Science Students" course at Moscow State Lomonosov University.

Since then, Olga has worked in a number of industries, including clinical research, where she moved from a core business function to application support & training to Project Management Office.
Olga is a certified Business Analyst, and has been working for the last two years for Touring Assurances/ Touring Verzekeringen, part of AXA Direct Insurance.

Recently she has taken on Product Owner responsibilities for one of the 4 Agile teams in the company.


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Ron Eringa

In his daily job Ron Eringa is an Agile coach, working at Prowareness.
Since he started his career in 2000 he has encountered lots of softare projects, struggling with traditional development methodologies, having forgotten how beautifull it is and how creative it can be to develop software.
However in 2004 he also encountered projects working with Scrum & Agile and he saw that teams rediscovered that original spark that made them become good software developers.

In the last few years Ron has been providing Agile workshops and coaching Agile teams while also participating as a Scrum master and Developer himself. Ron is an enthousiastic speaker, who enjoys to share knowledge and work with empowered teams.

In his private life, Ron is a husband and father of 2 daughters. His hobbies are running, skiing, photography and reading.


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Rob van Lanen

Rob van Lanen

Website: http://www.scrum.nl

Twitter: @robvanlanen

Having spent over ten years in software development, I have seen many different organizations and teams. When I started reading about Agile, I got hooked. I started implementing Scrum and eXtreme Programming practices in 2005 and I never went back to traditional software development.

I have seen and participated in traditional software development. Waterfall teams sliding through the mud and in the end not delivering at all. I have seen Agile gone wrong and even participated in the demise of these projects. However, I learned a lot from these experiences. I have also participated in successful Scrum teams and loved it. I have seen teams work hard to overcome all impediments that the implementation of Scrum made clear to them.

After several years of experience as Developer, Scrum Master, Product Owner and Development Manager, I want to share my lessons with the community. It is my passion to teach the agile mindset and help teams to build great products that end-users love. Guiding dedicated professionals to reach this goal is what makes me get up in the morning.

You can read more about Rob at www.scrum.nl.


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Jan De Baere

Jan is a change manager/advisor in the field of IT. His focus is towards business benefit and people. For GDF Suez (Electrabel Belgium, Netherlands and Germany) he transformed the project management method and introduced scrum, kanban and visual managment. Today Jan is a certified scrum professional active as Agile coach at Electrabel, Belfius, ADB...


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Rob Westgeest

I have been working in IT for about 18 years.

I have created software and taught and coached projects and individuals in analysis, design, programming and development methods.

I am a software engineer with a passion for both technology and people.

With WillemvandenEnde and MarcEvers I joined forces in QWAN (www.qwan.it).
We provide highly interactive training course on software development skills and agile software development in the Netherlands and abroad.


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Marc Evers

Marc Evers

Website: http://www.qwan.eu

Twitter: @marcevers

Marc works as an independent coach, trainer and consultant in the field of (agile) software development and software processes. Marc develops true learning organizations that focus on continuous reflection and improvement: apply, inspect, adapt.

Marc organizes workshops and conferences on agile and lean software development, extreme programming, systems thinking, theory of constraints, and effective communication. Marc is co-founder of the Agile Open and XP Days Benelux conferences.

He knows how to combine his real-world experience with knowledge that is out there to create novel solutions. He likes to add games to highly-rated workshops, so participants have fun and learn from experience.


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Hans Kalle

Hans Kalle

Website: http://lnkd.in/dSWybQi

Twitter: @johannis68

At RIGD-LOXIA, Hans helps 45 software developers to grow in the art of agile software engineering to efficiently deliver business value to their customers. In his opinion craftsmanship and a professional working environment are essential. As a consequence teams have great fun working together and are proud of their achievements each and every time.

Hans' goal is to bring the right people together, to promote the standards of RIGD-LOXIA and to help build a professional and productive working environment. He challenges and coaches the professionals to constantly improve the process of delivering quality software which will meet the clients' needs.


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Participants

Jan
Jan

Jan has been working as a programmer for 5 years now. Jan loves to program. He knows a lot of languages, and a lot of tools. At work, he he is not always happy because the circumstances often force him to deliver the quality he knows he can reach. Jan explores new technologies and trends on the internet and in books and magazines. At night Jan contributes to an open source project together with 10 other guys, from all over the world. That's where he heard about agile methodologies. In the open source group, he is used to work with unit tests, but he hopes to get some real in-depth tips and tricks from experts at the XP Days conference. He is also interested to learn about the latest trends for continuous intergration tools and test automation.

Meet Jan at the following sessions

Marieke
Marieke

Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis. Several months ago, her team had an introductory training on extreme programming and scrum. Some of the ideas she learned about seemed interesting enough, but she is not sure if this methodology is applicable in their particular situation. After the course, some of her colleagues started to write unit tests, but there still are only a few, and they are not run very often, as far as Marieke can see. They also started to do a daily standup meeting, because according to the trainers that is a tool to enhance communication within the team. But these meetings are rather boring, and they tend to take 1/2 hour, every day. Team members are grumbling about wasting their time.

Marieke started to think all this agile stuff is only an unusable hype. But then she heard about XP Days, and she thought "well, let's give it another chance, if 150 people go to this conference, for 11 years in a row now, maybe there is more to it". She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have applied these techniques, which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.

Meet Marieke at the following sessions

Leo
Leo

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. Over the years, Leo has been working as a developer, as a project lead, as a tester, as an analyst, as a manager, and as a consultant. He knows from experience that everything comes back, if you only wait a few years. He has learned that the same problems and the same solutions have been invented and re-invented a hundred times in computer science. He has lived through the rise and fall of uncountable new technologies and methodogies. All of them brand new, all of them the one and only forever best way to make software. Leo wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.

Meet Leo at the following sessions

Bram
Bram

Bram has never missed an XP Day. Well, to be correct, he has never missed a Benelux XP Day. He has been to several other XP Days in Germany, London, Paris, and in Italy, and also attended quite a few bigger agile and other conferences. Bram likes he XP Days, because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.

Meet Bram at the following sessions

Philippe
Philippe

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He has never heard about this agile stuff. He doesn't know what it is, or what it can be used for. He guesses it is something his boss wants to buy. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.

mmm I think maybe it is not very useful for Philippe to come to the XP Days? -Vera

Why not? Let Philippe come, let him relax and have a beer and dinner with agile people. He might even attend some presentations. And, once he's relaxed, who knows what could happen? --Pascal

Meet Philippe at the following sessions

Georges
Georges

Georges is a project manager. His life is filled with stress, deadlines, difficult programmers, unhappy customers and demanding bosses. Sometimes he wonders if he's chosen the right career.

Lately, Georges has been hearing more and more about agile methods. Some of his ex-colleagues have converted from project management to agile coaching. They tell him tales of vibrant, exciting, fun projects where customers and developers live in perfect harmony. That can't be true. They must be exaggerating. Or are they....?

Meet Georges at the following sessions

Vincent
Vincent

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. His teams don't do too badly. Some projects are allright; some don't fully satisfy their users. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. So, Vincent looks around for solutions that might help him to create and implement the plan. He has looked at a lot of things: processes, tools, consultants... He's heard that some other companies (even some reputable companies) have had success with "agile" methods, so he comes to the XP Day to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him. He doesn't know what to expect. Hippy surfer dudes? 18 year old wizz kids with piercings? Greybearded hackers? Oh well... What does he have to lose?

Meet Vincent at the following sessions

Joke
Joke

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke understands her customers needs, she has lots of ideas for new features that would enhance the product. She knows that this product really enhances its user's lives. That's one of the reasons her company is so succesful. But they have trouble keeping up with customer demand. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. If only she and the development team could work together more efficiently, they could make this product make more of a difference. Maybe this "agile" stuff can help? How does product management work in agile projects? Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.

Meet Joke at the following sessions

Hank
Hank

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. Appalled and bemused by the shocking waste of time, money, and people, he does his best to bring the joy back in the life of those around him by introducing agile methodologies wherever he sees the opportunity. Hank comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.

Meet Hank at the following sessions

Ellen
Ellen

Ellen is an agile coach. She's been using agile methods for a few years now. XP, SCRUM, Lean... it doesn't matter much to her. She's more interested in doing things that matter to deliver value for her customers. She wants to work with a happy team, doing meaningful work.

Ellen wants to learn new ideas and share experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.

Meet Ellen at the following sessions