Room 1

Room 2

Room 16

Room 17

Room 18

08:00

Registration, coffee, tea and breakfast

09:00

Opening Plenary

09:30

 Bourne Again. Bootstrap a testing framework in BASH

Rob Westgeest

Max: 35 

Code on Github
 Delegation is an Art

Jurgen De Smet &
Annelies De Meyere

Max: 30 
 Revenge of the Programmers 2

Nicole Belilos &
Victor Hezemans

Max: 30  

Video
 THINK DESIGN! How can we create solutions end-users will love?

Jens Broetzmann

Max: 20 
 Why we want digital taskboards and how they fail

Sebastiaan Elstgeest &
André van der Zijden

10:05

Bourne Again. Bootstrap a testing framework in BASH

CONTINUED

Delegation is an Art

CONTINUED

Revenge of the Programmers 2

CONTINUED

THINK DESIGN! How can we create solutions end-users will love?

CONTINUED

 Cheap User Testing

Florence Chabanois

10:45

Break

11:15

 Rally Test Game

Irène DOAN

Max: 24 
 Mind your language

Arjen Uittenbogaard

Max: 25 

Presentation (1MB PDF)
 Autonomy is like putting a Man on the Moon

Frederieke Ubels &
William de Ronde

 Willy Wonka's chocolate factory

Dajo Breddels &
Sabina Renshof

Max: 50 
 Made to stick

Sandra Warmolts &
Lilian Nijboer

Max: 30 

Presentation on Slideshare

12:30

Lunch

13:30

Afternoon opening plenary

14:00

 100 Minute experience: faster & cheaper from idea to product vision with videoprototyping

Alexander Krause

Max: 20 

description of videoprototyping in german & demo film
 Start Recovery! Transforming Addicted Organisations

Steve Holyer

Max: 60 
 Hands on session: Splitting up a problem into microservices

Erik Talboom &
Koen Metsu

Computer
Max: 20 
 the scaling game

Yves Hanoulle &
Markus Wissekal


Book on LeanPub
 eXtreme Listening

Ole Jepsen &
Olaf Lewitz

Max: 50 

15:15

Break

15:45

100 Minute experience: faster & cheaper from idea to product vision with videoprototyping

CONTINUED

 Your colleague is an idiot, how to tell him ?

Mélanie Applincourt

Max: 30 
Hands on session: Splitting up a problem into microservices

CONTINUED

 How to get middle managers out of the middle (and help them add more value)

Joanne Boerstoel &
Ruud Rietveld

Max: 20 
 1+1=3: Practices of eXtreme Programming applied to Management

Ralph van Roosmalen &
Daan van Osch


Description of practices

17:00

Closing plenary

17:30

Drinks



Legend
Technology and Technique
Intro's and Cases
Team and Individual
Process and Improvement
Other

Session descriptions

max
35

Bourne Again. Bootstrap a testing framework in BASH

Enjoying learning bash through bootstrapping a test framework in it - a kata

Rob Westgeest

In choosing a language for automating small build tasks feels like choosing a problem. For scripting languages like python and ruby you end up learning and polluting your machine with pip, virtualenv, chruby, rubygems and the like. And while bash is always around, it is not powerful enough! Or is it. Let me take you through an hour of bootstrapping a test framework (i.e. Test-Drive a test framework) in bash. You'll learn some bash and a great way to learn a new language.

Goal of the session: Learn some bash and a great way to learn a new language
Intended audience: jan, leo, bram, philippe, joke
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session
Materials: Code on Github

Have you ever written a test framework yourself? It is not that hard and a great way to learn a language. In this session I will take bash as an example. Bash is all around and often abandoned as a serious automation language and if used certainly not tested well enough and written using a trial and error method.

In this session i will take you through the steps of bootstrapping a testing framework in baby steps, very much in the style of Kent Beck's Test Driven Development by example. In other words we'll Test Drive a bash unit testing framework.

The session is an exercise in writing your own testing framework as much as it is a learning experience in bash.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Back to program

max
30

Delegation is an Art

Growing Self-Managing Teams

Jurgen De Smet & Annelies De Meyere

How do you manage to empower teams in such a way that it is useful and beneficiary to the organisation? As we support many organisations we have discovered a lot of helpful tools and techniques: RACI, LRC, DACI, Situational Leadership… and many more. All of them have some truth in them but there is only one that we experienced working 8 out of 10 times instead of occasionally: “Delegation Poker” in combination with “Authority Boards”.

Goal of the session: Understand how to grow Self-Managing teams
Intended audience: Leo, Bram, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Ellen, Marieke, Hank
Expected experience: No
Session Type: 75 min discovery session

In this rapidly changing world where change itself has changed, we need more people to be part of the system to provide evolutionary, disruptive and open innovation! Internet connections, data storage, mobile devices, genome sequencing, everything today is growing at an exponential rate where organisations need to be more adaptive, and change as fast as change itself.

Top-down controlled, managed organisations are bound to die as there is no time to aks for permission! The only way to survive in this new world is to get your organisation to engage with their (potential) customers and with their employees in order to find the change it needs to survive within this jungle of opportunities. Being slow is not an option anymore! Producing low quality is not an option anymore! Neglecting your customers is not an option anymore!

One of the options at hand is to grow self-managing mechanisms within your organisation that are empowered to swiftly act upon the opportunities at hand.

But how do you manage to empower teams in such a way that it is useful and beneficiary to the organisation? As we support many organisations we have discovered a lot of helpful tools and techniques: RACI, LRC, DACI, Situational Leadership… and many more. All of them have some truth in them but there is only one that we experienced working 8 out of 10 times instead of occasionally: “Delegation Poker” in combination with “Authority Boards”.

In this hands-on session we'll let you discover the power of those 2 techniques yourself and be able to apply them in your day-2-day work (even private) life.

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
30

Revenge of the Programmers 2

Let's make a movie!

Nicole Belilos & Victor Hezemans

This December, XPDays Productions proudly presents Revenge of the Programmers 2: uncut, remastered, revisited and unloaded.
The movie you have been waiting for, for 25 years.

The movie where Agile teams discover their super powers and face their daily enemies. With new problems, new solutions and new heroes.

You will be the actor, the screen writer, the director and everything you ever wanted. You will decide everything!

Come tot his session if you want to explore problems that you, as an Agile team member, still face. We will use the superhero brainstorm technique to find solutions to these problems. And we will create an awesome movie in the progress.

Goal of the session: Reflect on issues Agile teams (still) face, and find pro-active solutions to solve them.
Intended audience: Anyone, but especially people on the development team.
Expected experience: Experience with working in IT
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session
Materials: Video

This December, XPDays Productions proudly presents Revenge of the Programmers 2: uncut, remastered, revisited and unloaded.
The movie you have been waiting for, for 25 years.

The movie where Agile teams discover their super powers and face their daily enemies.
With new problems, new solutions and new heroes.

You will be the actor, the screen writer, the director and everything you ever wanted. You will decide everything!

Coming to you on December 4. Join now for your exclusive role in this amazing movie.

Come tot his session if you want to explore problems that you, as an Agile team member, still face. We will use the superhero brainstorm technique to find solutions to these problems. And we will create an awesome movie in the progress.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
20

THINK DESIGN! How can we create solutions end-users will love?

The Design Thinking Wallet Game

Jens Broetzmann

Get introduced to the Design Thinking concept and learn how to define and find solutions which are meaningful for your end-users. Step into the world of human-centered design, fast iterations and rapid prototyping. By playing the interactive "wallet game" from the Stanford dschool you will be guided through a full cycle of the design thinking process and will learn the basic ideas of this approach.

It is: Fast-paced | Experiential | Biased towards action (more doing, less talking about doing) | User-centered | Prototype driven |Iterative | Great Fun!

This session is interesting for anybody who would like to know how to find solutions and requirements which add real value for your end-users (product owners, team members etc.)

Goal of the session: Participants get an introduction to Design Thinking and learn how to define and find solutions which are meaningful for your end-users.
Intended audience: all
Expected experience: no- everybody welcome
Session Type: 75 min discovery session

Get an introduction to Design Thinking

Design Thinking as introduced by David Kelley from Ideo is a human centered design approach and a great process for problem solving. It starts with understanding the end-user, is iterative and builds on each other ideas with the goal to find a meaningful solution for end-users.

In this session the participants will work in pairs to play the wallet game. By this we will go through the whole Design Thinking Circle:

- Empathize: Interview partner to gain insights
- Define: Define a point of view based on your findings
- Ideate: Generate ideas and get feed-back
- Prototype & Test: Build a physical prototype (with paper and other stuff) and test it.

At the end of the session we will review and discuss together what we have learned.

Through this experience you will learn the basics of the Design Thinking approach (without the ins and outs of the different methods and tools). No previous design thinking experience needed.

It is great fun!


Back to program

Why we want digital taskboards and how they fail

This session will talk about taskboards, their grievances and how they can help to create engagement.

Sebastiaan Elstgeest & André van der Zijden

We've experienced and researched why physical taskboards help create engagement. We'll try to wrap this up in a short presentation so you'll know this too. In return we would like to hear your experiences and input on our new idea for a physical taskboard that will resolve most grievances.

Goal of the session: Gives you insights what works for taskboards and what doesn't
Intended audience: Bram, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen
Session Type: 30 min discovery session

It's quite logical that in the business where Agile was bred, IT, all sorts of tools quickly emerged to help you ordering your backlog and taskboard. Our experience in both commercial and education has taught us that physical taskboards help the team to be more engaged and be more effective. However that doesn't stop people complaining about the ugly walls we leave in our trail nor does this mean that those taskboards are ideal.

In this session we want to tell you about our experiences, what works about physical taskboards and digital taskboards and what doesn't. We'll have a look at our journey towards a better board and hope you will join in in this adventure so you can improve the communication and effectiveness of your team as well. We're looking for honest input and critique on our current product while also sharing learnings we've already acquired.

Agile frameworks only live up to their potential if human communication is at it’s best. To generate such an environment within an educational context we needed to stimulate
teams to be ‘present’, in every way possible. It turned out that a tangible representation of an (agile) project is very effective to (unconsciously) create this state of being ‘present’.

We also learned or ‘came to believe’ that when someone is engaged, ‘learning’ becomes a natural state of being. We became very eager to cultivate engagement so we are able to create effective learning environments. And once again a tangible representation of a project or concept helped students and developers to relate and therefor engage themselves. As long as people are able to think for themselves and therefor are allowed to make there own mistakes the are much more likely to stay engaged. Knowledge become a ‘means’ rather then a test- or assessment-goal.

So a physical task board seems to be the most effectieve and efficient solution to let teams be 'present', to optimise communication and to get them more engaged. But somehow most new attempts to improve the tasboard seem to be digital. Why not try to eliminate current disadvantages with a new physical task board? And thats what we are trying to develop.

Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

Cheap User Testing

Why and how I do user testing. So can you, with 0 euro starting tomorrow.

Florence Chabanois

User testing will save your company time and money, even when you don't have the time or money for it. Real life examples guaranteed.

Goal of the session: The guts to try and the conviction that user testing is not bonus. I also hope to break the idea that user testing is expensive in time and/or money.
Intended audience: Marieke, Leo, Brac, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Ellen
Expected experience: nothing is required
Session Type: 30 min short experience report (30 min)

When a project releases, it's the end for many people, although to me, it's a new beginning : I'm finally about to know if it meets the needs, if it simplifies my user's life, if our sales will increase !

This year, we increased the conversions by +35% on some step and doubled the leads of some clients. To get there, we conducted user tests. We did not have the time though. During those tests, I sometimes wanted to hide when the user was trying SO hard. I felt like I should apologize for the product. At the end, I was surprised when a tester managed to finish the task on the first try.

Actually, these tests helped us press right where it hurts. The sales, the marketing, the customer relations department, the developers and I didn't see these "functional bugs". Nobody did, except the users.

With this talk, you will understand how important it is to identify hypothesis in our beliefs and to expose them to the real world. You will be armed to run user tests in your company starting tomorrow, even with no money, even with a few time, even without developing, even when nobody cares about user tests (for now).

User testing is for product owners what test driven development is for developers : it's an everyday tool, it's part of our job and this is not negotiable. It's not ok to do it just once as well, we have to do it over and over again.

It's time to get out of your office.

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
24

Rally Test Game

do your User Acceptance Testing all together in 1 day-long game

Irène DOAN

Fed up with hard, long and stressful end-to-end release testing days and weeks at the end of your releases ?

Try out the "Rally Test Game" ! A fun way to find out a maximum number of defects in a small amount of time.

Better than a recipe or How-to, we will play and learn the Rally Test Game by example in this workshop.

/ This session will be : 15% Theory / 60 Game (testing without computer) / 25 Experience report + discussion /

Goal of the session: accelerate the User Acceptance Testing, writing better test cases, collect more frequently user feedbacks, reinforce the co-construction with end users... do it in a fun way ! come and try it.
Intended audience: Jan;Marieke; Leo ;Bram;Philippe ;Georges ;Vincent ;Joke ;Hank ;Ellen
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

Fed up with hard, long and stressful end-to-end release testing days and weeks at the end of your releases ?

Try out the "Rally Test Game" ! A fun way to find out a maximum number of defects in a small amount of time.

Better than a recipe or How-to, we will play and learn the Rally Test Game by example in this workshop.

You will see how Rally Test Game involves :
- writing better test cases
- ensuring collaboration within test teams
- co-constructing with end-users and dev teams

You will judge the RTG results and I hope that you will you use it as a regular acceptance test practice for agile as well as waterfall projects.

/ This session will be : 15% Theory / 60 Game (testing without computer) / 25 Experience report + discussion /

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
25

Mind your language

raising your awareness of the power of language

Arjen Uittenbogaard

Don't ever talk about a smooth machine anymore, when talking about team work. Mind your language! You might get what you imply.
Learn how your language gives away how you look at your team, your organisation and the change you're in. And learn how to shape the change by careful use of your language.

Goal of the session: Awareness of the power of language
Intended audience: Marieke, Leo, Bram, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen
Session Type: 75 min discovery session
Materials: Presentation (1MB PDF)

Do you still aim at a team running as a smooth machine? And do you like to attack problems?
Just two everyday manners of speech that give away a lot of how you look at the world. Is your team really a machine, with the team members just cogs? Do problems really need to be attacked? What would the department look like if we, for example danced with problems?

As a long time agile coach, and as a long time storyteller, I am very aware on how I speak and on how people I work with speak. I am aware of metaphors that are being used and how framing can drive opponents in a corner.

As an attendant of the XP-days you are most probably working in organizations and are dealing with change. Maybe you are even leading change. Being aware of your language and of that around you can be more valuable than you thought. In this session I will use an abundance of examples and put you to work to find more yourself. And we will try and work with these examples to see how we can turn them to our, and the organizations advantage.

I build on the work on metaphors by Gareth Morgan (Images of Organization, and Imaginization), the work on framing by Hans de Bruijn (Framing) and the work on non-violent communication by Marshall Rosenberg.

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

Autonomy is like putting a Man on the Moon

How we "implemented DevOps" at bol.com by striving for autonomous, productive & independent teams

Frederieke Ubels & William de Ronde

Bol.com is growing bigger and faster for years, with all growing pains of more people, a larger and more complex landscape, sharing codebases, more and more dependencies and bottlenecks. You’re always waiting for somebody, and there’s always somebody waiting for you. To battle this we decided to enable everybody to implement their own vision on DevOps – a great journey towards autonomy!

Goal of the session: “DevOps” is the next step after scrum or Agile. It’s not just something for start-ups, unicorns or enterprises, and not just in the US. It’s also for everybody in between & in Europe. It’s a great journey towards continuous autonomy that every company can undertake. We’ll show that continuously inspiring people can be a perfect replacement for upfront planning and that just doing & celebrating is a good way to create trust in your company. Practically, we show a framework that we think a lot of companies can copy to be successful in changing their ways of working.
Intended audience: Everyone interested in going to the moon
Expected experience: Agile does ring a bell, knowledge that in some companies there’s a difference between development and operations
Session Type: 75 min discovery session

Bol.com opened its doors on 30 March, 1999. Almost 16 years later bol.com is the largest (web)shop in the Netherlands and Belgium and market leader in the field of online sales of books, entertainment, electronic devices and toys, with over 5 million active customers and 900 employees.

Over the years bol.com has grown fast and steadily and the in-house IT department has been a powerful driver of innovation. To support our business with a short time to market and parallel progress in all key business areas, we started working agile in 2009. And to take all things necessary for growing further in our own hands, last year we built our own datacenter and insourced all web operations capabilities.

But when you’re growing you have to deal with growing pains: too many teams working in the same code, too many dependencies between development and operations, releases getting bigger and buggier, and the risk of frustrations getting out of hand. And with our ambition to grow more than 200 people every year, that’s not risk but a certainty.

So in the summer of 2014 we started Man on the Moon, our program to ensure scalability, productivity and motivation. Our goal is to help our teams to become independent & autonomous while delivering a continuous flow of new functionality. Putting a Man on the Moon is not just a program: it requires boldness, creativity, inventiveness and commitment of everyone in the organization. It’s a technical challenge and a cultural one as well. And it requires lift: of teams wanting autonomy, trust and tooling to fly their own mission.

In the program we focus on 3 things:

  • You build it, you run it, you love it: development teams pulling in operational run responsibility and eliminating dependencies that hold them down, one-by-one
  • Building a self-service & self-scaling platform to help us grow
  • A new IT organization that enables autonomy and combines build & run responsibility

At this moment some teams are still on earth, some are floating while others are preparing their landing on the moon. We redesigned the IT organization, gained scalability and boosted motivation and productivity. Releases are getting smaller and the number of incidents is dropping. We’re not there, but as with so many trips: the journey itself is as much fun as reaching the destination, so we have a great story to share about everything we did, messed up, learned and gained on the way.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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50

Willy Wonka's chocolate factory

Tasty way to learn about Queue's, Batches and WIP

Dajo Breddels & Sabina Renshof

Mr. Wonka needs your help to package the sweets and chocolates. We hope that you can be as effective as the Oompa-Loompas, because we would hate to disappoint those millions of kids who are looking for their orders.
A workshop about Product Developement Flow

Goal of the session: Impact of Batch Size, Impact of over Utilization, power of Self Organizing, Basics of Product Development Flow, and enough sweets and chocolates to last the rest of the conference.
Intended audience: GeorgeEllenJokeJanVincentHank
Session Type: experiential learning session

Welcome to Willy Wonka's chocolate factory!

The Oompa-Loompas caught the terrible Snurfnurf flu and are out of commission or at least two weeks. As you all know, it's the Oompa-Loompas who keep the factory running.

Mr. Wonka needs your help to package the sweets and chocolates. We hope that you can be as effective as the Oompa-Loompas, because we would hate to disappoint those millions of kids who are looking for their orders.

This workshop will provide hands-on experience, based on the book: Principles of Product Development Flow by Donald G. Reinertsen. During this session, we will review topics, including but not limited to: batch size, utilization and local vs. global optimization. Rather than a multitude of slides and complex theories, participants will experiment with those paramaters and see their impact directly by working in an assembly line. We will use pounds of real chocolates and sweets, so we recommend that you do not come hungry or you will fail as miserably as Augustus Gloop.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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30

Made to stick

Why some ideas survive and others die

Sandra Warmolts & Lilian Nijboer

What causes people to remember some and forget other messages?

During this session we will help you create messages that stick!

Goal of the session: To become better at creating messages that will 'stick'.
Intended audience: scrum masters, managers, coders, product owners, coaches, teachers or anyone who wants to get a message across on a regular basis!
Expected experience: no
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session
Materials: Presentation on Slideshare

Most of us have experienced it at some time. You give a course, and at the end people are full of enthusiasm to apply the learned. A week later little has changed and a lot of what you tried to share is forgotten. Or you write a beautiful newsletter (or vision, business strategy, recruitment message etc.) and find the message you tried to get across did not even reach the people that actually read it. And it doesn't even have to be a "big" message for a huge audience. Maybe you gave a raving speech on why to carry out a certain code change and the next day you can start explaining it all over again.

Some other messages with no real direct benefit or relevance (commercials, song lyrics), people will remember for a lifetime. What causes people to remember some and forget other messages?

During this session we will help you create messages that stick!

Using the guidelines (which we will explain during the first part of the session) from the book "make it stick" we will create messages in groups regarding the real life situation of one or more team members. We will find out which messages stick best and why, and see if maybe we can add some guidelines we discovered during the session.

After this you won't have to explain yourself twice again!

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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20

100 Minute experience: faster & cheaper from idea to product vision with videoprototyping

This is Design-Thinking for product developers: use your hands, get into visual thinking mode, iterate & have fun

Alexander Krause

Ideas are hypotheses that need to be proven! To get into this mood small teams create a user-journey and bring that user to life. Simple, small, empathic, credible, testable and with a smile.

Goal of the session: sync teams, develop empathy for the user, get in the mood for playful testing and transfer the technique to your work
Intended audience: product managers, product owners, scrum masters, developers, managers, users
Expected experience: no experience needed
Session Type: 150 min discovery session
Materials: description of videoprototyping in german & demo film

Create easy, entertaining and short cartoon videos to visualize complex ideas. Experience the process within 100 Minutes and deliver a test-film at the end. It is a technique that was developed in Berlins lean startup scene within the last 6 years to visualize new products and business-models.

Using this technique, you can easily create any number of one minute movies just by drawing and cutting out simple paper figures that you can use freely to visualize the story of your idea, product or feature. As the movie is only a very rough visualization of your vision the audience will very likely be inclined to think about possible improvements and willing to give constructive feedback.

You gain a powerfull tool to spread your vision and prepare the product backlog. This Workshop starts with an idea that is developed via the Lean Canvas, a Persona, a Script and a Storyboard to a complete short-film of a user-journey. Small teams are lead through the process and present their own movie in the end.

The participants can easily integrate this technique into their daily work.


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60

Start Recovery! Transforming Addicted Organisations

Steve Holyer

Change is hard!
Really hard!

Why doesn't change stick? Is you organisation actually addicted to harmful practice?

Does your organisation soothe long-term pain with practices that provide short-term relief but fail to address—or even add to—long-term problems? When the pain relief wears off, does your organisation go for another short-term fix? If so, your organisation may be hooked on practices that prevent real change!

Identify your organisation’s addiction, and explore patterns to break it.
Start recovery.
Make long-term change stick—one day at a time.

Goal of the session: 1. Understand Weinberg’s addiction cycle of short-term gain, long-term pain - and realise how this relates to your organisational behaviour. Get new insight into using this model to analyse and understand why change doesn’t stick in your system.2. Learn how to identify and understand the “triggers” feeding your organisation’s addiction to bad practice. Find alternatives to addiction "triggers".3. Apply recovery patterns to working for healthy organisational change.
Intended audience: Marieke, Leo, Bram, Philippe, Georges, Vincent, Ellen
Expected experience: Suited for anyone working in a modern (or not so modern) organisation
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

Why won't change stick to your organisation? Is you organisation actually addicted to harmful practice?

Does you organisation soothe long-term pain with practices that provide short-term relief but fail to address—or even add to—long-term problems. When the pain relief wears off, does your organisation go for another short-term fix? If so your organisation may be hooked on things which push-back real change!

Identify your organisation’s addiction, and explore patterns to break it.
Start recovery.
Make long-term change to stick—one day at a time.

We will discuss Jerry Wienberg's model of organisational addiction described in Volume 3 of Quality Software Management.

We will see how this model can be used to explain frustrating, previously intractable, problems with organisational behaviour.

We will play a new innovation game (I co-developed with Nancy van Schooenderwoert) to get a better understanding of organisational addiction and learn how to identify it.

We will take this learning and see how prohibition ("just say no") leads to more addiction, and we will explore ways to actually break addiction.

This model and tool is a soft-skill in your toolbox that gives you another approach to systemic coaching in your organisation.

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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20
Laptop

Hands on session: Splitting up a problem into microservices

A nice cocktail of hardcore OO design mixed with some microservices, flavoured with single responsibility

Erik Talboom & Koen Metsu

During this hands-on coding session you will get to explore the domain of poker building microservices in full isolation. You will compete to be the laziest pair in the session by avoiding all behaviour that doesn't really belong in your services and only building what others need from you.

Goal of the session: Let's look at responsibility in code and get introduced to the concept of microservices at the same time.
Intended audience: Jan, Marieke, Leo, Philippe, Hank
Expected experience: Intermediate
Session Type: 150 min hands on coding/design/architecture session

Based on my experience facilitating code retreats I have had many similar questions and challenges over the last few years. One concept that I challenge every single pair on at some time is the single responsibility principle. When developing different concepts of one problem it is very easy to break single responsibility, just because it is convenient to do so.

During this session we will do a short modelling exercise on a given problem after which we will split the group in pairs. Each pair chooses their own domain concept to work on and creates a microservice around this concept. When you need something from another concept, you will go and talk to the pair that is implementing this concept and agree on a service contract so that you can continue your implementation. Together we will also agree on how our microservices will communicatie with each other. Preferably in a way that we don't all have to work in the same language.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

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the scaling game

experience scaling issues by playing with multiple teams

Yves Hanoulle & Markus Wissekal

Although it's not easy, as an agile community we "know" how to do agile in teams.
One of the next challenges is scaling.

In this game you will experience scaling problems.

Do you have an idea that will make scaling easier? Try your idea in our game and get instant feedback.

Goal of the session: experience scaling
Expected experience: no
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session
Materials: Book on LeanPub

Game proposal: the scaling game
Presenters: Yves & Markus
Process mechanics : Game / Workshop
Description: During the game you will experience scaling issues that occur when multiple teams work on the same product. Multiple Teams will look for solutions to scaling issues and experiment in an iterative way with their ideas on solving them..

Learning outcome:
Attendees will face a series of typical scaling challenges like:
team synchronisation
efficiency
standardisation
optimisation of expertise
distributed teams

Duration: 75 minutes
Audience : This workshop is for everyone who wants to experience the problems of scaling development teams. People will not write code, this makes it possible for both technical and non-technical people to work together.
Has the content been presented at previous conferences:
The scaling game is based on a very popular agile game, that has been around for xx years.
This version has been proposed for ALE15. I intend to test it out in the coming months even if the proposal is not accepted.
It was created by Markus Wissekal & Yves Hanoulle.

Your speaker experience :
Both Markus and Yves have been speaking at local and international conferences.
They have been helping companies with scaling issues. They have used that experience to add different scaling issues into the game.

Abstract / Short summary :
Process and timetable: (total time 75 min)
Introduction to scaling issues: 5 minutes
Round 1: warm up in local teams 5 minutes
Round 2: multiple rounds solving different scaling issues with a partner team (total 20 minutes)
Round 3: multiple rounds solving different scaling issues with groups of 4 small teams collaborating (total 10 minutes)
Round 4: all teams have to collaborate in one large factory 5 minutes
Small retrospective inside the teams 5 minutes
Large joined retrospective (at the end) 25 minutes


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50

eXtreme Listening

So you thought you were listening…?

Ole Jepsen & Olaf Lewitz

Listening is the basic skill of connection, learning, and collaboration.
Listening provides the space for development of ideas, for co-creating.
Sadly, we rarely listen with mindful attention. We rarely listen with all our senses. We rarely listen to the space, the systems, our software, our world. We rarely listen to what happens within ourselves.
We have been programmed to listen in order to respond.
We want to learn together to listen in order to understand, to sense, to deeply connect with ourselves and each other.
eXtreme Listening will unlock unused dimensions and amplify skills of understanding you never knew you had.

Goal of the session: Create an aha-moment: This is what it feels like to really listen. And be listened to: to feel felt.
Intended audience: Jan, Marieke, Leo, Bram, George, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: none.
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

Listening is the basic skill of connection, learning, and collaboration.
Listening provides the space for development of ideas, for co-creating.
Sadly, we rarely listen with mindful attention. We rarely listen with all our senses. We rarely listen to the space, the systems, our software, our world. We rarely listen to what happens within ourselves.
We have been programmed to listen in order to respond.
We want to learn together to listen in order to understand, to sense, to deeply connect with ourselves and each other.
eXtreme Listening will unlock unused dimensions and amplify skills of understanding you never knew you had.

When - while you are listening - you start thinking about the other person THEN you’re not listening. Most of us think about what to say next, what advice to give, how we can relate the other person's story to our stories - while we’re listening, and then we’re not really listening. So listening is not only about stop talking. Listening is also about stop thinking, about anything other than the other person and what the other person is telling you.
And it’s a whole new experience. Intense, almost therapeutic. For both you as the listener and for the other person being listened to. As the listener you obviously understand much better when you really listen. And it’s almost a relief, a certain state of mind: you give yourself a break from your own thoughts and just let yourself become a part of the other person’s stories for a while. For the person being listened to, it’s amazing - for once - having the full attention, the space for a conversation about you, and only about you. When you get questions from the listener, the questions are only to explore your story, and to create a better understanding of your story. This - funny enough - improves the understanding of both the listener and the person being listened to. What a starting point for leading, coaching, sparring and collaboration of any kind. Pst: Come and listen! And be listened to!

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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30

Your colleague is an idiot, how to tell him ?

How to prepare and give constructive and respectful feedback ?

Mélanie Applincourt

Of course sharing feedback is crucial for an agile team... but it is not so easy to give interpersonal feedback to our colleagues. Do you give feedback, how?

Let's see together what are the rules and how some canvas from human sciences (NLP: Neuro Linguistic programming and NVC: nonviolent communication) can help us to prepare and give feedback.

Our ability to give a constructive feedback can have a direct impact on the continuous improvement dynamic in our team...

In this session you will have the opportunity to learn practical field techniques for sharing feedback and put them into practice.

Goal of the session: Participants will feel comfortable giving a constructive and respectful feedback to a colleague.
Intended audience: jan, Marieke, Leo; Bram, Philippe, Georges, Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: No specific experience required
Session Type: 75 min discovery session

Continuous improvement is crucial for an agile team. Giving a direct feedback is the best way to solve a conflict or help people to improve a specific behaviour.

In theory, giving feedback is a reflex any member of an agile team should have.
But in practice, I experienced that it is very difficult, especially when we speak about personal and negative feedback.

In this session we will see how to give relevant and respectful feedback.

First we will see why direct feedback is so important in an agile team and why it is so difficult to give feedback to another person.

Then we will explore different tools and canvas from human sciences that can be very useful to prepare and give feedback:
- The logical levels from NLP (Neuro-linguistic programming)
- The Nonviolent Communication process
You will also receive some practical tips to give and receive feedback.

In the second part of the session you will have the opportunity to put into practice and try the different techniques by sharing feedback on case study with other participants.

These tools will allow the participants to feel comfortable to give feedback and to express it in a clear and respectful way.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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20

How to get middle managers out of the middle (and help them add more value)

Middle managers are people too, be one and experience!

Joanne Boerstoel & Ruud Rietveld

Practice hands-on on how to get middle managers out of the middle!

Experience what it feels like to be a middle manager; experiment with real-life situations.

Learn from experiences of other participants and understand your limiting beliefs and system boundaries.

Goal of the session: Gain more insight into the position of middle managers and how you can help them to really add value.
Intended audience: Marieke, Leo, Bram, Philippe, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Ellen
Expected experience: working in organisation with at least two layers of managers.
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

In this session we will experiment handson on with challenges in getting middle managers out of the middle.
You can experience what it feels like to be a middle manager, gain insights with real life cases/situations. Get to learn from experiences of other participants and understand your limiting beliefs and system boundaries.

We will use techniques from systemic working and organisational constellations here, so an open mind is necessary!

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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1+1=3: Practices of eXtreme Programming applied to Management

Or, how learning from development practices made us better managers...

Ralph van Roosmalen & Daan van Osch

What can people in a lead position learn from the best practices and principles applied in eXtreme Programming? In this session we will share how we apply values from XP in our day-to-day work. How we apply unit testing, apply collective ownership and do 'pair programming' in management.

Goal of the session: Have a broader view on management than classic management principles and learn about new insights on how you can act as manager.
Intended audience: Leo, Georges, Vincent, Ellen, Bram
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session
Materials: Description of practices

In this session, we will discuss how certain values, best practices and rules found in XP can also be applied by leads. We have found there to be a big overlap between XP and management techniques. We believe that those values, best practices and rules hold a lot of truth for many people and can therefore be applied by everyone. You do not need to be a manager to act as a manager.

For example, we will share how you can apply:

  • XP values such simplicity, feedback, courage and respect in managing your multi disciplinary, distributed scrum teams.
  • Best practices such as coding your unit tests first and how to apply that in management. Whenever we apply a change in the organization we think about how we can measure the results of these changes.
  • Use of collective ownership. Delegate and let other people become co-owners of processes and procedures.
  • Integrate early and often. Have frequents one on ones to stay tuned to what is happening in your teams.

We will give examples how thoughts found in XP have been applied by us as management principles.

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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Presenters

Rob Westgeest

Twitter: @westghost

I have been working in IT for about 18 years.

I have created software and taught and coached projects and individuals in analysis, design, programming and development methods.

I am a software engineer with a passion for both technology and people.

With WillemvandenEnde and MarcEvers I joined forces in QWAN (www.qwan.it).
We provide highly interactive training course on software development skills and agile software development in the Netherlands and abroad.


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Jurgen De Smet

Jurgen De Smet

Website: http://www.co-learning.be

Twitter: @JurgenLACoach

Jurgen De Smet was a guiding hand in one of the largest Agile transitions in EU Healthcare. A master of game techniques for serious enterprise, he has taken companies in some of the most risk-averse, regulated industries and made them rock star achievers of sustainable innovation.

His Belgium-based company Co-Learning supports senior and middle management and entrepreneurs in building and sustaining learning organizations. Known as tough, knowledgeable, persistent and energizing, he is a driver of Gamestorming across Europe, a Innovation Games Qualified Instructor, and the first to implement Luke Hohmann’s concepts for citizen participation in Budget Games outside the United States.

Jurgen is a Certified LeSS (Large-Scale Scrum) Trainer, Licensed Management 3.0 trainer, the author of "Budgetspelen: Inwoners bepalen het beleid!" and "The Effective Use of Gamification Techniques in the Practical World", co-author of "Personal Kanban in a nutshell: The practical guide to personal happiness" and a leader in regional and global communities of practice that keep him freestyling with the best.


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Annelies De Meyere

Annelies De Meyere

Website: http://co-learning.be

Twitter: @endimi

Annelies tumbled into Agile by proxy through her husband and the interesting network she encountered, and started mixing these newly discovered skills in her day-to-day work as Service Manager in a high security environment. Feeling the need for better communication across teams and levels within organisations, Annelies made the switch to become an Agile process coach via Co-Learning. Helping companies adapt towards a more flexible way of working, guiding teams towards better results and facilitating change management. She is now a brainstorm facilitator, trainer and coach for teams and individuals, Management 3.0 practitioner, Certified LeSS Practitioner and Certified Orange Belt Innovation Games Architect.


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Nicole Belilos

Nicole Belilos

Website: http://www.xebia.com/agile

Twitter: @nicolebelilos

Nicole Belilos helps organizations, teams and individuals on their journey to Agility. She is an experienced change agent, has strong communication and interpersonal skills, and is appreciated for her hands-on, no-nonsense approach.

Nicole started her career as a C-programmer in the waterfall world. She was introduced to Agile in 2005 and has been an enthusiastic adept ever since. She likes to focus on the human side of Agile, believing that communication and teamwork are key factors for business success. Therefore she is fascinated by the way gender and culture affect the way we interact.

Nicole believes in education and learning. Her lectures and workshops are always highly interactive, spiced with games, role playing, improv theater, group interaction and reflection.

Nicole contributes actively to the Agile community and is an appreciated speaker at Agile conferences.


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Victor Hezemans

Victor Hezemans

Hi I’m Victor Hezemans, I’m a student in communication, international event, music and entertainment studies. I specialise in concept development, digital media and gamification.

I’ve also studied ICT for 3 years. This makes me able to connect the two worlds of ICT and communication to bring out the best in them. This is also the reason for my interest in the media like photography, video and most of all gaming. It is my vision that these media can enhance the quality of things like education and work environments.

I was also raised in an Agile home so ever since I was young the homework and chores have been going on the scrum board.


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Jens Broetzmann

Jens Broetzmann

Website: https://nl.linkedin.com/in/jensbroetzmann

Jens is Agile coach and since 15 years involved in software implementation projects. Besides improving the IT value chain he likes to organise and facilitate Design Thinking Workshops with customers to find innovative meaningful solutions for the end users. He is a big fan of the Lean Start-up and Running Lean philosophy and his mission is to define and implement products which add real value for the end-users. Jens is German and speaks fluently Dutch and English.


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Sebastiaan Elstgeest

Sebastiaan Elstgeest

Website: https://about.me/s.elstgeest

Twitter: @SebasElstgeest

Working at the Academy Creative Technologies ACT (Academy Creative Technologies) of Saxion (university of applied scienses):
Concept development, proof of concept, pitching, planning & tracking, internal and external communications, creating self-propelled teams, value driven output, co-creation. Theories used: Simon Sinek; 'Start With Why', and brothers Heath; 'Made to stick'

I'm participating within the Saxion Research Centre for Design & Technology, mostly as projectleader within the chair: Media Technology Design

Founder and co-leader CME: platform for ambitieus and talented students and alumi.

Co-leader within the Saxion Excellence program for the academy Art and Technlogy; StartupYourself
Co-leader for developing education that develops and catalyses an entrepreneurial mindset and attitude. Using lean startup principles: i.e. Eric Ries, Steve Blank, Alexander Osterwald.

Projectleader for various independent crossover projects where innovation is required to serve a need or solve a given problem.

Inspire and advise teachers, departments and companies 'why they could', and 'how they can' implement agile frameworks.

More about my motives:

I'm convinced that:
People are talents not functions.
Talent only awakes when there's a vision to live up to.
You should practice what you teach.
Common sense should always prevail and Agile-based frameworks are delivering just that.

I'm focused on:
Value driven optimization in whatever I'm doing (=innovation)
WHY, than HOW, than WHAT.
Being a durable and sustainable contributor (relative to the higher requirements of the project)

I love to:
Get fully involved.
Let other people get fully involved.
Work together and create (little) miracles.

I'm interested in:
How personal talents and passions lead to the optima forma of someone's ability to delivering value
Models that give insight in value delivery (i.e. BM canvas).
Value driven frameworks (scrum).
Education that involves 'students' and 'teachers' to reach self-actualisation and deliver value.

About applied research:
"Let value validation do the talking, but it better be lean!"


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André van der Zijden

André van der Zijden

Website: http://www.thinkblink.nl

Twitter: @zijdena

Hey, thanks for dropping by! :) I'm a product owner and agilist, I like to help bring people together in teams and help them to grow that team to epic deeds. I've been a product owner since 2009 and have been involved in many agile projects and transformations. I love to help my company and team to continuously improve them and theirselves.

Next to that I'm involved in developing the Patboard with Sebastiaan, which we think will help teams to even further improve their communication and also helps remove some of the impediments with organisations who don't want "ugly" task boards on their wall.

Last but not least I like to play a game (or two) in my spare time. This could be a video game or a board game as I like them both :)


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Florence Chabanois

Florence Chabanois

Website: http://devsnotebook.fr

Twitter: @fchabanois

Florence has been developping and scrumMastering for years. She's now a Product Owner in Car&Boat media (LaCentrale.fr, Promoneuve.fr, AnnoncesBateau.com).

She likes trying stuff and learning through feedbacks. That makes her interested in lean startup as well.


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Irène DOAN

Irčne DOAN

Website: http://idetido.wordpress.com

Twitter: @idetido

From IT domain, Irène works as agile coach at Orange Applications for Business. She is in service of people, teams and organizations to grow their values and performance. What she prefers are agile values, UX design, change management and facilitation.


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Arjen Uittenbogaard

Arjen Uittenbogaard

Website: http://www.altimos.nl/

Twitter: @verhalenmaker

I'm a longtime (15+ years) agile coach and trainer. I have an IT background, but nowadays most of my attention is in the 'individuals and interactions' area. I like creative, unorthodox approaches. My experience as an improvisation actor and storyteller help with that.
In September, I and four colleagues founded our company Altimos. We help professionals, teams and organizations become more agile.


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Frederieke Ubels

Frederieke Ubels

Twitter: @freubels

Frederieke Ubels has been working for bol.com for 10+ years. She started as the manager of the book department, and switched to IT in 2007. Her background in the marketing department has played a key role in aligning the IT organization with the business departments within bol.com. As a Director IT Innovation she is responsible for continuous improvement of the innovation process at bol.com, alignment with business departments and for the transition to a DevOps way of working, to ensure scalability of the IT organization. This helps bol.com grow, stay ahead of the competition and hold its leading role in (e)commerce in the Netherlands and Belgium.


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William de Ronde

William de Ronde

Website: http://www.bol.com

Twitter: @iPappa

William de Ronde joined bol.com 10 years ago. In the years since, he did a full Tour of Duty in IT: as a developer, project manager, manager technology and head of operations. His experience combined with his gut feel way of working made him the best candidate to lead the migration to bol.com’s newly built datacenter in 2014. Now that that’s completed very successfully, he’s the IT Innovation Manager helping the IT organization to stay on the edge by constantly motivating every engineer, manager and director to get the most out of themselves.


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Dajo Breddels


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Sabina Renshof

Website: http://www.bureaubd.nl

Twitter: @sabinarenshof

"Happy teams making things that Matter"

Sabina is a certified Scrum Master I and II/ product owner/SAFe Programme consultant and works both for non-profit and profit organizations. She is an experienced coach, trainer and consultant in agile and scaled agile transitions. She is used to work with international and distributed Scrum teams and brings agile to product- and programme management, sales- and marketingdepartments and hr. The next step in her agile journey is working on becoming a Scrum Trainer at Scrum.org. Looking forward to the interview with Gunther and the peer review. Hope to see you all at our workshop!


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Sandra Warmolts

Sandra Warmolts

Twitter: @sannygr

Agile project leader, SCRUM master, Lean Agile coach, Agile trainer

Sandra Warmolts has been in Software Development for over 20 years. 13 years ago she got involved with Agile and stuck to it.
The commitment, openness, teamwork and collaboration between teams and business just suits very well.
She loves working with teams and they seem to like to work with her. She teaches them how being Agile can make their work so much fun and have a happy customer as well.
She's working with teams doing SCRUM, KANBAN, SAFe and "just their own thing".
When she's not working, she a mom for her two kids, 12 and 11 years and a lovely wife ;-). She likes to play tennis, do fitness and go out for dinner.


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Lilian Nijboer

Twitter: @llillian

Lilian has been working in IT for over 15 years (not 20 cause she is much younger than her co-presenter). She has been active in the agile community for the past 7 years and has her own company with which she tries to help organisations work towards a common goal and deliver value while having fun at the same time. When she is not working she enjoys spending time with Bert and their three (step)daughters and granddaughter (I know I look way too good to be a grandmother). She does have a gym membership and usually can get herself to go there about once a week.


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Alexander Krause

Alexander Krause

Website: http://www.agil-inform.com

Twitter: @agilechanges

photographer -> web-designer -> event manager -> project manager -> entrepreneur -> design-thinker -> scrum trainer -> agile coach -> cortisol killer


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Steve Holyer

Steve Holyer

Website: http://www.steveholyer.com

Twitter: @zurcherart

Steve Holyer serves as advocate, trainer and mentor for companies, leaders and change agents looking for a better way of working using Agile practices.

He learned his craft serving as a Scrum Master with multiple teams and organisations, so he knows how to change an organisation from the inside.


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Erik Talboom

Erik Talboom

Website: http://co-learning.be/

Twitter: @talboomerik

Hi, I am Erik and I am a human being. This immediately defines my biggest passion in life: humans and what it means to be human. I love challenging people's current situation, their professional and/or personal status quo. Co-Learning how we can all improve our way of collaborating and working, while having fun at the same time. That is my second passion in life: playing. I play board games, roleplaying games and computer games and I am continuously looking for ways to use these concepts in my professional life as well. Because play does not mean silly, it means fun and motivating.

My professional life is centered around my passion for people and play. I mostly work as coach, both agile and lean as well as technical coach for software craftsmanship and personal coach for deeper psychological understanding. Next to that I try to be the game master as much as possible while facilitating meetings, stimulating collaboration and helping to channel creative energy.


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Koen Metsu

Koen Metsu

Website: http://www.koenmetsu.com

Twitter: @koenmetsu

Koen Metsu is a freelance .NET developer who loves to learn, share and practice everything related to how we build software.
Eight years in the business have left Koen with a passion for simplifying solutions and reducing friction to create better software.

He loves to learn by exploring new languages and building stuff, and rambling about it at an Open Space.
He co-organizes the Belgian Community for Software Craftsmanship and SoCraTes Belgium, a 3-day unconference for developers to discuss and practice their skills.

When he's not doing any of the above, he likes to practice rock climbing, or watch and discuss movies and anime over a good whiskey or beer.


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Yves Hanoulle

I worked as software support, developer, team lead, trainer, agile coach, change artist, first follower, thought jockey. These days I call myself Creative Collaboration Agent.

I believe that IT is mainly about working with people.
A skill that can never be learned enough.

Team startups & retrospectives are my favorite ways to help your team(s).

y


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Markus Wissekal

Markus Wissekal

Website: http://www.agilerescue.de/

Markus Wissekal is an experienced agile practitioner that has been in IT for more than 15 years.
He started his journey to become agile as the technical lead of a start-up in '03.
Skip ahead 4 years he finished his masters in medical computer sciences,
when he became more interested in creating effective teams than software.
Nowadays he has broadened his skills to also coach departments in an enterprise environment.
He loves talking at international conferences about agile topics that are dear to his heart.
Markus is a certified scrum practitioner (CSP) and an accredited kanban trainer (AKT).


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Ole Jepsen

Ole is the founder of goAgile and a highly esteemed Agile facilitator and mentor for organizations looking to lead change. Using his expertise in Agile methodologies, Ole shows how gaining varying perspectives and sharing experiences brings about the best ideas that can be used throughout the organization.

Ole is a founder of the Agile Leadership Network (ALN), having started the “Learning and Recognition” Committee—working on defining and implementing a three-level certification program for great Agile Project Leaders. Ole is the founder and leader of the Danish Agile User Group – and he is active in the international agile community, speaking at conferences and consulting worldwide. Ole is also a Certified StrategicPlay® Facilitator with LEGO® SERIOUS PLAY™.


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Olaf Lewitz

Olaf Lewitz

Website: http://trustartist.com

Twitter: @olaflewitz

Olaf: I am an agile coach and trust artist.
My mission is to create spaces and experiences where individuals and organisations dare to trust themselves and each other a little more. My passion is increasing choices for people, reducing oppression in our minds, our organisations, our societies.
I believe: you deserve to love what you do.
I am an agile native, having started with XP in 1999, when someone finally wrote down how software development really worked.
I'm an XPDays addict and been going on cold turkey on it for a while. Love to be part of it again!


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Mélanie Applincourt

With more than 10 years working with IT development teams I experimented different contexts form corporate to start-ups as well as different methodologies. I love agility because it matches my personal values: learning, pragmatism, collaboration, commitment...
I am interested in personal development techniques and I like to see how to use them in a pragmatic way to help teams to be more efficient.


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Joanne Boerstoel


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Ruud Rietveld

Ruud Rietveld

Twitter: @RuudRiet

Pragmatist, team builder, fun-loving chaotic.
Scrum Master, trainer, coach
Becoming a better facilitator, session by session.
Strong trust in teams.


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Ralph van Roosmalen

Ralph van Roosmalen

Website: https://nl.linkedin.com/in/ralphvanroosmalen

Twitter: @raroos

I believe that people make in the end the difference in every project. Their skills, how they work together and how they feel in a project. Scrum, Kanban, eXtreme Programming, Management 3.0 are in the end just tools or frameworks which are there to help us.

I have been working in IT since 1997. I had different roles, from developer, tester, Scrum Master, Agile coach, lead, manager, VP, etc. However, what I always liked was working with people to improve the process, the environments they work in.

Some of my highlights of my career so far are:

In 2015 I decided to start my own company, Agile Strides. Agile Strides would like to help people and organizations making a next step, help them become happier in their work. This can be for example done by improving the way teams work together, improving the software development process, help them to become more engaged or teach them how to improve their own environment.


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Daan van Osch

Daan van Osch

Daan van Osch is an experienced Scrum Master and has been practicing Scrum since 2006. He started out as a software translator, became a techwriter, software tester, test lead and release manager. Through his journey in agile and lean and by his shop-floor experience, Daan built up a wealth of pragmatic knowledge that he know uses as a software director in the day-to-day management of a challenging sustaining engineering department.

In his role as internal scrum master trainer, Daan has been responsible for training all new generations of scrum masters in his company. He is a firm believer of making a 1% change every day in his team, department and company. Most of all, Daan is about making the people in his organization experience a safe, fun and challenging work environment.


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Participants

Jan
Jan

Jan has been working as a programmer for 5 years now. Jan loves to program. He knows a lot of languages, and a lot of tools. At work, he he is not always happy because the circumstances often force him to deliver the quality he knows he can reach. Jan explores new technologies and trends on the internet and in books and magazines. At night Jan contributes to an open source project together with 10 other guys, from all over the world. That's where he heard about agile methodologies. In the open source group, he is used to work with unit tests, but he hopes to get some real in-depth tips and tricks from experts at the XP Days conference. He is also interested to learn about the latest trends for continuous intergration tools and test automation.

Meet Jan at the following sessions

Marieke
Marieke

Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis. Several months ago, her team had an introductory training on extreme programming and scrum. Some of the ideas she learned about seemed interesting enough, but she is not sure if this methodology is applicable in their particular situation. After the course, some of her colleagues started to write unit tests, but there still are only a few, and they are not run very often, as far as Marieke can see. They also started to do a daily standup meeting, because according to the trainers that is a tool to enhance communication within the team. But these meetings are rather boring, and they tend to take 1/2 hour, every day. Team members are grumbling about wasting their time.

Marieke started to think all this agile stuff is only an unusable hype. But then she heard about XP Days, and she thought "well, let's give it another chance, if 150 people go to this conference, for 11 years in a row now, maybe there is more to it". She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have applied these techniques, which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.

Meet Marieke at the following sessions

Leo
Leo

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. Over the years, Leo has been working as a developer, as a project lead, as a tester, as an analyst, as a manager, and as a consultant. He knows from experience that everything comes back, if you only wait a few years. He has learned that the same problems and the same solutions have been invented and re-invented a hundred times in computer science. He has lived through the rise and fall of uncountable new technologies and methodogies. All of them brand new, all of them the one and only forever best way to make software. Leo wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.

Meet Leo at the following sessions

Bram
Bram

Bram has never missed an XP Day. Well, to be correct, he has never missed a Benelux XP Day. He has been to several other XP Days in Germany, London, Paris, and in Italy, and also attended quite a few bigger agile and other conferences. Bram likes he XP Days, because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.

Meet Bram at the following sessions

Philippe
Philippe

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He has never heard about this agile stuff. He doesn't know what it is, or what it can be used for. He guesses it is something his boss wants to buy. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.

mmm I think maybe it is not very useful for Philippe to come to the XP Days? -Vera

Why not? Let Philippe come, let him relax and have a beer and dinner with agile people. He might even attend some presentations. And, once he's relaxed, who knows what could happen? --Pascal

Meet Philippe at the following sessions

Georges
Georges

Georges is a project manager. His life is filled with stress, deadlines, difficult programmers, unhappy customers and demanding bosses. Sometimes he wonders if he's chosen the right career.

Lately, Georges has been hearing more and more about agile methods. Some of his ex-colleagues have converted from project management to agile coaching. They tell him tales of vibrant, exciting, fun projects where customers and developers live in perfect harmony. That can't be true. They must be exaggerating. Or are they....?

Meet Georges at the following sessions

Vincent
Vincent

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. His teams don't do too badly. Some projects are allright; some don't fully satisfy their users. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. So, Vincent looks around for solutions that might help him to create and implement the plan. He has looked at a lot of things: processes, tools, consultants... He's heard that some other companies (even some reputable companies) have had success with "agile" methods, so he comes to the XP Day to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him. He doesn't know what to expect. Hippy surfer dudes? 18 year old wizz kids with piercings? Greybearded hackers? Oh well... What does he have to lose?

Meet Vincent at the following sessions

Joke
Joke

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke understands her customers needs, she has lots of ideas for new features that would enhance the product. She knows that this product really enhances its user's lives. That's one of the reasons her company is so succesful. But they have trouble keeping up with customer demand. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. If only she and the development team could work together more efficiently, they could make this product make more of a difference. Maybe this "agile" stuff can help? How does product management work in agile projects? Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.

Meet Joke at the following sessions

Hank
Hank

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. Appalled and bemused by the shocking waste of time, money, and people, he does his best to bring the joy back in the life of those around him by introducing agile methodologies wherever he sees the opportunity. Hank comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.

Meet Hank at the following sessions

Ellen
Ellen

Ellen is an agile coach. She's been using agile methods for a few years now. XP, SCRUM, Lean... it doesn't matter much to her. She's more interested in doing things that matter to deliver value for her customers. She wants to work with a happy team, doing meaningful work.

Ellen wants to learn new ideas and share experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.

Meet Ellen at the following sessions