Room 1

Room 2

Room 16

Room 17

Room 18

08:00

Registration, coffee, tea and breakfast

09:00

Opening Plenary

09:30

 Where No One Has Tested Before: The Case For Textless Environments

Emmanuel Gaillot

 Ice breakers, powerful tools for teambuilding

Giovanni Puliti

Max: 25 
 3M EUR later - Moving a Team to become Agile in a Company with Too Much Money

Thierry de Pauw


Presentation on Speakerdeck
 Agile Fixed Price

Giulio Roggero


Slides on Slideshare
 Freedom within bureaucracy, or reaching hackstability

Paul Kuijten


Slides on Slideshare

10:05

Where No One Has Tested Before: The Case For Textless Environments

CONTINUED

Ice breakers, powerful tools for teambuilding

CONTINUED

 How to win a solar challenge race by using Scrum

Jeroen Molenaar

Max: 129 

win a solar race using scrum
Agile Fixed Price

CONTINUED

Freedom within bureaucracy, or reaching hackstability

CONTINUED

10:45

Break

11:15

 Sharpen your story splitting skills

Alexander Helleboogh &
Johan Tré

 Doubles on Stage

Olivier Azeau


Play script
 May the Agile force be with you...

Els De Geyter

Max: 24 
 Responsibility model

Jan De Baere &
Gertjan Deserrano

Max: 36 

12:30

Lunch

13:30

Afternoon opening plenary

14:00

 Look ma, no frameworks!

Stefano Leli &
Antonio Carpentieri

Computer
Max: 30 
 Xtreme Facilitation

Jenni Jepsen &
Ole Jepsen

Max: 36 
 Reinventing organizations game

Ron Eringa &
Martijn Dehing


Download materials
 More with LeSS

Jurgen De Smet &
Nelis Boucké

Max: 30 
 Getting to Green

Rob Smorenburg &
Marc Evers

Computer
Max: 40 

15:15

Break

15:45

Look ma, no frameworks!

CONTINUED

Xtreme Facilitation

CONTINUED

 Leadership on Stage

Wim Heemskerk &
Dirk Mulder

Max: 60 
 Women in Agile: are we leaning in?

Nicole Belilos &
Mary Beijleveld

Max: 25 
Getting to Green

CONTINUED

17:00

Closing plenary

17:30

Drinks

18:30

Dinner

20:00

Evening activities



Legend
Technology and Technique
Customer and Planning
Intro's and Cases
Team and Individual
Process and Improvement
Other

Session descriptions

Where No One Has Tested Before: The Case For Textless Environments

How to test-drive your code, in a language as foreign as GLSL

Emmanuel Gaillot

We'll show how we can use TDD to build a non-trivial shader in GLSL (OpenGL Shading Language). This tutorial is intended to push the limits of what is considered doable with TDD. This is a performative programming session: the audience will watch a performer programming for its (the audience's) benefit some non-trivial piece of code from A to Z. Some people like to watch by doing themselves. If you belong to this strange crowd, bring a laptop. But really this isn't mandatory or even encouraged.

Goal of the session: 1) to learn how to test-drive one's developments in contexts where there is no tool, framework, or even text output;2) to get a taste about all kinds of cool graphics you can render with a GPU;3) to inspire others running live coding sessions themselves, and thus contributing honing the skills of the programmers' community;4) to meet programmers who enjoy exotic languages;5) to have fun watching someone showing off.
Intended audience: Jan, Leo, Bram and Hank.
Expected experience: This session is intended for developers of all confessions, aspiring developers of all ages, and professionals of all trades who wish they were still developers. Attendees should have at least some theoretical understanding of what TDD is, and a practical experience at programming software. Knowledge ofnon-aristotelian drama theory isn't required.
Session Type: 75 min hands on coding/design/architecture session

Test-Driven Development is desperately simple. Simple, because it takes about five minutes to understand the principles. Desperately, because real-life contexts seem always harder than case studies used for training -- at least by forty-two orders of magnitude.

Just for laughs, we'll aim this time at doing the opposite (to practice TDD in a more difficult context than the typical workplace) and we'll show how we can use TDD to build a non-trivial shader in GLSL (OpenGL Shading Language). This tutorial is intended to push the limits of what is considered doable with TDD. By doing so, we hope to make the audience realize that if it's possible to test-drive code in GLSL, it should be possible to do so in virtually any TDD-resistant environment.

This is a performative programming session: the audience will watch a performer programming for its (the audience's) benefit some non-trivial piece of code from A to Z. In the spirit of the Brechtian theatre, the audience is encouraged to laugh at the misery of the programmer on the stage, to be critical of their (the programmer's) successes, to cheer and to boo, to smoke and to eat, and to think about what they'd do (better) if they were in the same position.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Back to program

max
25

Ice breakers, powerful tools for teambuilding

Teamwork is a great thing, but it is not always so easy to be part of a team...

Giovanni Puliti

Ice breakers are a powerful tool to facilitate the team working. In this session we will see some exercises and games to help the creation of the groups, collaboration, communication, or even just to break the ice and create a close-knit group.
Once a student in a class said: "thanks to the exercises that you have made us , I found myself working with others like I know them for a long time , even if we met this morning for the first time " The goal of this session is exactly this.

Goal of the session: have fun with a lot of games, exercises, plays to learn something about how we interact, how we stay togheter, how we think...
Intended audience: Jan, Marieke, Leo, Bram, Philippe, Joke, Hank, Ellen,
Expected experience: no experience required
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

Agile methodologies give great importance to the concept of the team, to being part of a group where people work together to achieve goals.
Teamwork is a great thing, but it is not always so easy to be part of a team.

Tuckman through its five stages model (forming, storming, norming, performing positions) explained that, before reaching the stage performance, a team must pass a series of steps related to the growth of the team itself.
As agile coach often find myself having to facilitate and simplify the process of growth to get in the easiest and fastest in the performing stage.

Due to my experience in the theater of improvisation, in public speaking, agile coaching, creating communities within organizations, I have collected a number of useful tools such as ice breakers and then simplify the phase of team building.
I use them in my classes, but also in the coaching of development teams and in general all the times when you need to find a way to help people know each other. My set of ice breakers embraces issues of serious gaming, time management and time awarness, comunication and public speaking skills, agile management team and more.
At the end of these exercises in the group circulated a positive energy, joy and the desire to work together.
I would like to share them with you.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

3M EUR later - Moving a Team to become Agile in a Company with Too Much Money

Or how a bunch of people evolved in 3 years to a Team of DevOps delivering value inside an enterprise.

Thierry de Pauw

How do you go from a ragtag of people having no idea what it means to be Agile, stuck in eternal maintenance and operational work, applying none of the basic software engineering practices to a team of DevOps delivering value for their customers in sprints of 2 weeks ?

This session addresses the impediments the team encountered in becoming one of the most Agile teams of a company that generates truck loads of money with hardly no competition.

Goal of the session: What are the problems you can encounter during an agile transformation at a typical enterprise company
Intended audience: Marieke, Leo, Bram, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Hank
Expected experience: None
Session Type: 30 min short experience report (30 min)
Materials: Presentation on Speakerdeck

How do you go from a ragtag of people having no idea what it means to be Agile, stuck in eternal maintenance and operational work, applying none of the basic software engineering practices to a team of DevOps delivering value for their customers in sprints of 2 weeks ?

Imagine a very profitable company with hardly no competition that made waterfall an institution.

This is the story of one team within that company. Imagine a team that is not really a team, but a bunch of people that happened to have the same manager. No-one knew what the other was doing. Each one was managing his application, or worse part of an application. A bunch of technologies was used. Automated tests, version control and process were totally inexistent. Internal customers were trained to wait forever for new functionality or worse received functionality the developer thought was good for them.

I would like to share with you how this team became in 3 years one of the most Agile teams of that company. What were the problems this team encountered and why.

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Back to program

Agile Fixed Price

More complex is the project more difficult is to meet the customer expectations. Let's how Scrum can streamline customer collaboration in a Fixed Price project.

Giulio Roggero

Scared to use Agile in a Fixed Price project? Add 7 super powers to your agile tool-kit!

Goal of the session: Some idea on how agile can be applied with success in projects that start as "not agile at all" projects and how much is important the customer collaboration and focus on solve end user problems.
Intended audience: Philippe, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: Basics about Agile and Scrum
Session Type: 30 min discovery session
Materials: Slides on Slideshare

How to run a project when scope, time and cost is fixed from day one? How to collaborate with your customer to have success with the project that have a lot of constraints? How to bring out the true value for your end-users?
Approaching the project in an agile way!

In this talk we will see a true story about a project that started as a "fixed all" and have been delivered successfully in time, in budget and with the true value for the end user.

The approach? Use the 7 "super powers" for customer collaboration :-)

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

Freedom within bureaucracy, or reaching hackstability

Escaping the suffocating violence of bureaucracy and be agile

Paul Kuijten

Over twenty years of agile software development have taught us that it is difficult. Numerous futile attempts to convert the value extraction machine have failed. We severely misunderstand the nature of the beast that we are dealing with.

Revolutions have attempted to overthrow the system and install another. Revolutions are no more. We need to find freedom from within the system. Freedom to be agile and innovative. Freedom to create. Freedom to play.

We can, through reaching hackstabilty, a state of continuous tinkering in the direction of maximal interestingness.

Goal of the session: Participants will get a refactored perspective on agile software development and its nature.
Intended audience: jan, leo, bram, marieke, philippe, georges, vincent, joke, hank, ellen
Expected experience: intermediate
Session Type: 75 min discovery session
Materials: Slides on Slideshare

Over 20 years of agile software development have taught us that it is difficult. Numerous futile attempts to convert the value extraction machine have failed. We severely misunderstand the nature of the beast that we are dealing with.

In this session we will look at bureaucracy's true nature. Value extraction ultimately resting on the threat of violence. It's everywhere we look, yet so uncomfortable to look at, that we usually look away.

Revolutions have attempted to overthrow the system and install another. Revolutions are no more. We need to find freedom from within the system. Freedom to be agile and innovative. Freedom to create. Freedom to play.
Yet that same suffocating bureaucracy provides us freedom as well. Nothing is scarier than the absence of rules.

Join me in my quest for successful agile software development without a revolution.
The key to this is the acknowledgment of the civilised-barbarian differences between exploitation and innovation, and the need to balance them.


Talk is largely inspired by "Utopia of Rules" and "Breaking Smart Season 1". These sources made a million things fall into place for me with regards to agile software development within large organisations. As a result, I am more effective, and can relate to more people I work with.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
129

How to win a solar challenge race by using Scrum

Jeroen Molenaar

How do you build a solar car? Okay and how do you win a race with a superlight solar car? We as agile coaches had no clue. Never the less we started helping out an engineering team to build their car from scratch in a year and win the most prestige’s solar race in Australia (http://www.worldsolarchallenge.org/). We want to share our experiences with coaching this team. We share what we have learned from coaching a vehicle building team instead of software.

Goal of the session: Scrum and agile principles are applicable everywhere.
Intended audience: anyone who like engineering
Expected experience: agile
Session Type: 75 min discovery session
Materials: win a solar race using scrum

How do you build a solar car? Okay and how do you win a race with a superlight solar car? We as agile coaches had no clue. Never the less we started helping out an engineering team to build their car from scratch in a year and win the most prestige’s solar race in Australia (http://www.worldsolarchallenge.org/). We want to share our experiences with coaching this team. We share what we have learned from coaching a vehicle building team instead of software.
Most importantly, we learned couple of awesome things we would have never learned by only staying in the software teams. All we learned is directly applicable (back) to software teams.
And of course, 'our' guys won the race! So how did scrum or we (as coaches) help?

Learning Outcomes:
- How to apply scrum in engineering?
- How to create a doing mindset
- What difference does a tangible product make?
- How did scrum made the difference?
- What were the challenges we solved (fun, overtime, cooperation, planning, making it happen etc)

Prerequisites Knowledge: Basic knowledge about Agile/Scrum

Information for Program Team:

We love searching new areas where we can apply scrum to. We also have a great passion for cars. Combined with an agile assignment for TomTom seeking for an inspiring keynote speaker, Paul got in close contact with Wikispeeds Joe Justice a few years back (who already combines the both). Joe applies scrum and lean principles in producing and manufacturing his own car. In the spring of 2014 we took the first Extreme Manufacturing course from Joe in Seattle.
In parallel, we got in contact with the Delft University racing teams and they requested some basic coaching how to make the development of their cars more flexible and efficient.
With all this knowledge, experience and good practices we successfully started coaching a hydrogen and solar racing car team who needed to build their car in 1 year (which preferable would win the race). Engineering race cars using cutting edge technology demand a different approach than manufacturing. In this perspective, Extreme Engineering took of as an idea.

But above all, our session is all about this intriguing, inspiring and very fun story. We're convinced we will inspire attendees to our session being more creative, fun and productive in their future agile projects.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

Sharpen your story splitting skills

Become a fearless slicing Sushi Chef!

Alexander Helleboogh & Johan Tré

Learn to widen your story-splitting horizon.

Goal of the session: In this session you'll gain hands-on experience with splitting stories, apply and classify common patterns for splitting and learn to evaluate the story split.
Intended audience: Jan, Marieke, Leo, Bram, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: novice
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

Recognise this non-popular question?
"It's too big, shouldn't we split?"

- "Here, it's FAR more complex, we CANNOT split this!"
- "We CANNOT split, it has no value otherwise!"
- "Stories E2E, that's too big!"
- "Splitting? Let's just work on this during multiple sprints!"

Despite the widespread use of stories in agile development, many struggle with splitting large work into small pieces in a useful way.
Unthoughtful splitting prevents incremental development and results in low value delivery and late feedback.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

Doubles on Stage

The world first theater play where the action takes place in an automated test environment!

Olivier Azeau

Coder is in a bad mood. He always thought of himself as a software development virtuoso but when his teammates told him they wanted to use TDD, he had no other option. Tests, Red, Green, Refactor. He had to learn them all and he had to do it right now. He starts reading Gerard Meszaros' xUnit Test Patterns but quickly falls asleep.

What happens next? The code and the tests become alive...

A fresh look at Outside-in TDD with "live" code.

Goal of the session: See TDD in live action. Experience another way of learning or teaching.
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session
Materials: Play script

Coder is in a bad mood. He always thought of himself as a software development virtuoso but when his teammates told him they wanted to use TDD, he had no other option. Tests, Red, Green, Refactor. He had to learn them all and he had to do it right now. He starts reading Gerard Meszaros' xUnit Test Patterns but quickly falls asleep...

What happens next? The code and the tests become alive...

A fresh look at Outside-in (aka "London school") TDD with "live" code: members of the audience will come on stage and literally play the code and the tests in a TDD session.
While "classic" TDD is mainly about state and algorithm, "London school" TDD deals with components and interactions making it a perfect match for the stage.

The actors and the public will discover or re-discover the test driven development activities under a new light: what usually happens in the head of the coder (getting feedback from the test, introducing a double...) will be visible. This will give the audience an opportunity to think about the open options for the coder at every step of the TDD practice.

Incidentally, since the session makes no use of computer technology, it is also an opportunity for non-coders to learn about TDD.


Back to program

max
24

May the Agile force be with you...

while setting the next steps into agile organizational development

Els De Geyter

Become an agile Jedi, during our interactive workshop, and experience how the 4 powers of the agile force can help you to deal with the hardest agile challenge: setting up an agile culture.

Goal of the session: After attending this session you will understand the relationship between the agile manifesto and the next level of organizational development and you will know how to use the agile force to support the further development of your organization.
Intended audience: Vincent, Georges, Leo, Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: Knowledge of and little experience with agile practices
Session Type: 75 min discovery session

Many surveys show us that the hardest agile challenge is setting up an agile culture.
That’s why there is only one choice: starting today with making the whole organization agile.

This will serve your company to set the next steps into organizational development towards the ‘teal organization’(*), characterized by three major breakthroughs:

-Self-management: driven by peer relationships.
-Wholeness: involving the whole person at work
-Evolutionary purpose: let the organization adapt and grow, not be driven

‘Teal organizations’ already exist today, so what are we waiting for?

In this session you will get to know the 4 powers of the agile force, you will discover why ‘Teal’ is the agile colour and you will understand how the agile practices you use today have the potential to support the transition to the next level of organizational development.

(*)The Teal organization (cfr. Reinventing organizations by Frédéric Laloux) is based on the colour scheme of Integral Theory, to describe the historical development of organizations: from Red over Orange and Green to Teal.

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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36

Responsibility model

Leadership is 99% selfleadership.

Jan De Baere & Gertjan Deserrano

Do you consider yourself to be a responsible person? Why? In what ways?
Think about somebody you know who is very responsible.
How does that person demonstrate responsibility?

In this session we dig a little deeper in the mental states discovered by Christopher Avery when researching responsiblity.

Goal of the session: Awareness on the Responsibility process and where to find more info when you are interested.
Intended audience: Marieke; Bram; Philippe; Georges; Vincent; Ellen; Joke; Hank
Expected experience: no knowledge required
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

Jan de Baere and Gertjan Deserrano will take you on a quick journey through our own mental states and how they impact our behaviours.
Through a simulation game we will discover the responsibility process of Christopher Avery and practice on our own awareness. Aim is that you know the model and have practiced it.

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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max
30
Laptop

Look ma, no frameworks!

Extreme programming begins with extreme simplicity. Start by choosing a framework, and simplicity goes out of the window!

Stefano Leli & Antonio Carpentieri

Have you ever wondered what it was like before application frameworks became popular, starting directly from “main”? You might think that working without frameworks is incredibly wasteful, as you have to write tons of bootstrap code. Well... in this session we'd like to show you that it needn't be like this!

You'll write a web app in Java, starting from that "main", and replacing things frameworks do for you with just a few tens of lines. So if what stopped you from trying to go frameworkless was that you didn't know how to start, then come to this session.

Goal of the session: Improved spider sense for simplicity in software development
Intended audience: Jan, Leo, Hank,
Expected experience: Experienced as well as less experienced developers welcome
Session Type: 150 min hands on coding/design/architecture session

Simplicity is one of the core values of XP. "A simple design always takes less time to finish than a complex one." [0] The problem then is that of understanding: "what is simple"? It turns out that "simple" is not what most programmers think.

Have you ever wondered what it was like before application frameworks became popular? When a new project started with writing a "main" function? When you and your team were responsible for the design, good or bad, of all of your system? Maybe you think that working without frameworks is incredibly wasteful, as you have to write tons of bootstrap code. Or perhaps you fear that writing your own design from scratch could lead to a mess. Well... in this session we'd like to show you that it needn't be like this!

You can write a web app in Java, starting from "main", and you replace many things that frameworks do for you with just a few tens of lines of code. You can write elegant code! So if what stopped you from trying to go frameworkless was that you didn't know how to start, then come to this session!

In this session you will code a new Java web application, starting from our instructions and our skeleton code. You will do pair programming, implementing each stage of the exercise in turn. It will be possible for you to influence the direction of the development, by voting on which stage to do next.

Most of the material has been developed by and with Matteo's team for an actual customer (and we delivered on time, with nearly zero defects, and the app is still going strong after 3 years!) Some of the code has been refined over 8 years of teaching web apps in university. Some has been refined in years of in-house TDD training.

[0] http://www.extremeprogramming.org/rules/simple.html

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

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max
36

Xtreme Facilitation

Amplify your ability to involve & engage

Jenni Jepsen & Ole Jepsen

Stop settling for mediocre workshops with just-good-enough facilitation! We all know how critical facilitation is to creating ownership and results - for Agile or Any way of working. So let's be better! This session is about challenging facilitators to take their abilities to the next level. Jenni and Ole will share WHY it is so important to involve and engage people + the neuroscience of facilitation and more advanced how tos. Their "Facilitation Nerd Alerts" will get participants thinking about how to push their own limits as facilitators. Each participant will plan a workshop during the session. And maybe we'll sing...

Goal of the session: Learn WHY and how to step up your facilitation game
Intended audience: Anyone who needs to involve & engage people to create results
Expected experience: Should know facilitation basics
Session Type: 150 min discovery session

Stop settling for mediocre workshops with just-good-enough facilitation! We all know how critical facilitation is to creating ownership and results - for Agile or Any way of working. So let's be better! This session is about challenging facilitators to take their abilities to the next level. Jenni and Ole will share WHY it is so important to involve and engage people + the neuroscience of facilitation and more advanced how tos. Their "Facilitation Nerd Alerts" will get participants thinking about how to push their own limits as facilitators. We'll discuss how to create safe environments, get all the issues on the table, deal well with apathy and dissent, and come to a real result in your workshops (as well as techniques to do so). Each participant will plan a workshop during the session - however, due to time restrictions, not everyone will run their workshop - so we will do a random draw.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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Reinventing organizations game

Discover what it takes to reinvent your organization towards Agility

Ron Eringa & Martijn Dehing

Agile transformations are all about changing culture. With this game you will discover what factors can help in creating a cultural environment that is more in line with the Agile manifesto.

Goal of the session: Awareness about the different organisational culture models; the ability to assess and bring further their organisation.
Intended audience: Everyone dealing with organizational change
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session
Materials: Download materials

As agilists we are continuously focussing on changing organization culture & behaviour.
In 2014, Frederic Laloux published a book with his research on the evolution of managing organizations. We have developed a game where people can experience this model of organizational evolution.

What can you expect:

  • People will experience what kind of practices & behaviour they should apply in moving towards a 'Teal' organization
  • We have put experiences from colleagues and customers into the game (of course completely anonymous)
  • We will invite you to share your experiences
  • We will incorporate\crowdsource your experiences into the game itself
  • And last but not least. We will have lots of fun!

We've played the session af few times before. Although we have gathered a number of experiences based on that, people like the most to come up with their own scenario's (so that's what we will be focussin on)

We will provide some handout materials to take away and make the game available afterwards, to those who'd like to play it themselves

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
30

More with LeSS

Truly Scale Business Agility in Product Development

Jurgen De Smet & Nelis Boucké

An interactive session where we are going to apply one of the key principles of LeSS: Systems Thinking. Together we will explore one of the main factors of pain in Large-Scale Scrum adoptions. Doing so we'll discover better ways to scale Agile in large organisations without fancy titles, no trains, no layers of management having more business Agility and less parts.

Goal of the session: Understand how to use Systems thinking when scaling Agile in organisations and how it relates to LeSS
Intended audience: Leo, Bram, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Ellen
Expected experience: Understanding of Scrum, Agile in general
Session Type: 75 min discovery session

  • Large? Don't
  • Multisite? Don't
  • Offshoring? Don't

But it is a reality we have to live with and for those product development companies going towards several thousands of people in their R&D, it is causing huge problems and pains.

In this interactive session we are going to apply one of the key principles of LeSS: Systems Thinking. Together we will explore one of the main factors of pain in Large-Scale Scrum adoptions. Doing so we'll discover better ways to scale Agile in large organisations without fancy titles, no trains, no layers of management having more business Agility and less parts.

Possible discoveries for the attendees related to Scaling Scrum with LeSS:

In empirical process control__
more learning & adaption, less prescription & following
more root-cause countermeasures, less quick fixes
more safety & transparency, less fear & opacity
more on principles, less on practices

In scaling__
more system, less parts
more customer-feature teams, less roles, silos, overhead, handoff, scatter

In agile values__
more organisational agility & learning, less “work the plan”

In lean thinking__
more teaching, less telling
more value, less muri, muda, mura

In impact mapping & value-driven management__
more outcomes, less outputs

Are you ready to discover how to truly scale business agility together with us? Or are you ok to live with the burdon of not knowing?

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
40
Laptop

Getting to Green

TDD session exploring an ordered list of transformations leading to simpler, better code

Rob Smorenburg & Marc Evers

The TDD cycle states: write a test, see it fail, make it work, refactor. We're guided by principles like baby steps and "Do the simplest thing that could possibly work". But how do you find the simplest next step to make the test pass? How can you find the next baby step and prevent the apparently inevitable big leap you sometimes have to make? Is there more to it than gut feel and intuition?

There is a set of transformations you can apply to get from Red to Green. These have names, but more importantly, there seems to be a logical order. If you obey this order, you are less likely to get stuck and more likely to arrive at simpler, more efficient code.

In this workshop, we'll introduce these transformations and let you experiment with them hands on.

Goal of the session: Explore a novel, promising approach to get from a failing test to working code, in a structured, disciplined way, possibly preventing occasional big leaps and impasses you encounter while doing TDD
Intended audience: Jan, Marieke, Leo, Bram, Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: Some experience in TDD
Session Type: 150 min hands on coding/design/architecture session

You might know the feeling: just as you're doing great with your tests, you run into a situation where you're unable to get the next test working without structural change to the production code. Or you have finished your test, you inspect the test coverage, and find out that again you wrote production code without a test that requires it. Can you prevent these situations?

"Getting to green" is about the Red-Green-Refactor cycle from test driven development. To get from Red to Green, we want to take baby steps. At each step a small, simple transformation should be sufficient to get from red to green.

This session explores the ideas and transformations that were introduced by Robert C. Martin in his Transformation Priority Premise article.

His premise is that 1) there is a set of well-defined transformations to make failing tests pass and 2) there is a logical order in which to apply these transformations: by taking this order into account, you should be able to avoid big steps and impasses.

Examples of the transformations are: going from no code to nil/null, going from nil to a constant, going from unconditional code to an if. They are in a way similar to refactorings (but refactorings keep tests green and the transformations make a test green).

In this workshop, we are going to investigate the premise of the transformations and their logical order. We introduce the transformations using a coding kata. After the introduction, you will get to work on another kata. Bring your own device, language and development environment. You'll write all the code yourself or you'll pair up with another participant.

Learning about these transformation will help you improve your test driven development and design skills. It will also (possibly) help you in finding baby steps to proceed. As a community, we hope to learn more about structured ways of getting from red to green.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
60

Leadership on Stage

Become the agile leader you want to be

Wim Heemskerk & Dirk Mulder

Practice leading knowledge workers effectively, without throwing them of a cliff or suffocating them. Practice responding to your manager in a way that gains you more autonomy to do the most valuable job.

Goal of the session: Learn how to gradually change leadership style to allow people to act more responsibly and pro-actively and to give your manager the confidence he can leave it to you.
Intended audience: Any manager or subordinate open to improving the way he/she interacts with management or subordinatesJan, Marieke, Leo, Bram, Philippe, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: All levels
Session Type: 75 min discovery session

How do you lead knowledge workers in today's fast changing world? How do you get them to be pro-active, to think and take action themselves. As a creative networker, how do you want to be led and how do you influence that?

In this workshop we'll explore how to allow for self-organisation without throwing subordinates of a cliff and your organisation into chaos, and how to respond to a manager you experience as patronizing or suffocating. We'll introduce you to the Ladder of Leadership, a practical tool for changing leadership one step at a time, and use improvisational theatre to practice applying it to your situation.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
25

Women in Agile: are we leaning in?

Nicole Belilos & Mary Beijleveld

Where are the Agile women? And why would this matter to men?

Agile can be seen as the feminine injection in the traditional male-dominated IT world. However, we still see that women are under represented and less active in this domain. There are far more men than women in critical Agile roles like Scrum Master, Product Owner, coach, trainer and public speaker.

In this session, we will investigate together why women are currently holding back, what their impediments are, and what we can do to help them move forward. We will leave the session with tips & tricks for both men and women to increase female participation in the Agile world and truly lean in.

The session is for people of all genders.

Goal of the session: Raise awareness and find solutions to increase the participation of women in Agile and IT
Intended audience: Everyone , all genders
Expected experience: We'd like participants to have some experience working in an Agile environment
Session Type: 75 min discovery session

Where are the Agile women? And why would this matter to men?

Agile can be seen as the feminine injection in the traditional male-dominated IT world. However, we still see that women are under represented and less active in this domain. There are far more men than women in critical Agile roles like Scrum Master, Product Owner, coach, trainer and public speaker.

Is this something to worry about in 2015?
Is this important for men, too?
We think so!
Because both men, women, teams and companies in general benefit when there is a balanced participation of men and women, and when all employees reach their full potential.

In this interactive session we will discuss the situation of women in (Agile) IT. We will look at the current facts and figures, and examine what causes the differences. We will explore some physiological and institutionalised differences between men and women.
With the participants, we will investigate why women are currently holding back, what their impediments are, and what we can do to help them move forward.
We will leave the session with tips & tricks for both men and women to increase female participation in the Agile world and truly lean in.

The session will be a mix of lecture, based on our research, and interaction with the participants, to discuss their views, obstacles etc. And to find some solutions together to solve the obstacles. The session is for people of all genders.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

Presenters

Emmanuel Gaillot

Emmanuel Gaillot

Website: http://ut7.fr

Twitter: @egaillot

Emmanuel works as a team coach, (extreme) programmer, facilitator, trainer and systems jiggler. For the last 10 years he has been helping software makers to be better at, prouder of, and happier about the work they produce.

A regular speaker at many conferences on Agility, Emmanuel also co-organizes the annual Agile Open France conference. He is one of the founders of the Coding Dojo in Paris. Emmanuel works in Paris at /ut7, a co-operated business he learns to hack with his fellow colleagues. He currently focuses his energy and passion on learning and teaching exotic programming languages, on practicing with (Virginia Satir's) techniques of family therapy, on shaping self-organizing structures and setting up co-learning spaces.


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Giovanni Puliti

Giovanni Puliti

Website: http://www.agilereloaded.it

Twitter: @giovannipuliti

Born in Florence on 31.1.1970

Since 1996 he coordinates the italian web magazine MokaByte, which is also one of the creators. The magazine, available completely free at www.mokabyte.it, one of the most important resources in italian dedicated completely to Java.
As part of the activities related to the magazine, organized the first two editions of the Italian Java Tour, a tour of conferences in major Italian cities, co-author of several books on Java from MokaByte in collaboration with the major publishing houses.

He works as a consultant for Java Enterprise Architectures, Service Oriented Architectures and Agile Project Management with leading Italian companies.
Many experiences as chief designer in the development of enterprise applications in the industrial and financial.

As Certified ScrumMaster® (Scrum Alliance’s CSM) and Certified Scrum Product Owner (Scrum Alliance’s CSPO), he helps companies in Lean Agile adoptions and rollouts, with organizational coaching and consulting services. He acts as an organizational coach and works directly with the managers of IT and business teams in order to help them assimilate, deploy, and apply Agile principles.

 He is able to follow the evolution of organizations and to suggest solutions adapted to their Agile maturity level. Experienced in helping startup companies to setting up the team (from the recruitement to training and coaching people on agile process).
Facilitated the creation of community of practice made up of dozens of people in several large companies (banks and insurance companies)

As Certified HPT Coach (Complexity Institute) he help people and organization and businesses to become more productive by removing their obstacles to peak performance that inhibit personal and business growth. Has used techniques of transactional analysis to improve the communication relationship between the management and the development team.


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Thierry de Pauw

Thierry de Pauw

Website: http://thinkinglabs.io

Twitter: @tdpauw

Jack of all trades, master of none (aka full stack developer). Longtime (15+ years) software engineer, apprentice devops. Passionate about software development in the broad sense. In continuous search for simple, easy to understand design and solutions.

I like to help teams in creating meaningful software, with a keen eye for code quality and software delivery process - from customer interaction to continuous delivery. Instead of balancing quality & delivery, I believe and practice that better quality is actually a way to more and better deliveries.


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Giulio Roggero

Giulio Roggero

Website: http://www.agilereloaded.it/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/giulioroggero

I'm an entrepreneur and startupper. Since 2000 I work as software developer helping clients to solve end-users problems.

My experiences: co-founder and CEO of Agilereloaded.it, the Italian agile coaching company; co-founder and CTO of MakeItApp.eu, the first mobile platform where people create Apps together; senior partner and CTO of Intre.it, a software house specialised in IoT and Industrial Automation.

I belive in Agile Values and that it's important learn by doing: before tell stories I want to try them in first hand.


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Paul Kuijten

Paul Kuijten is an experienced Agile/Scrum coach, practicing Scrum since 2006.
Paul is a recovering Prince II practitioner, who once was a pretty bad programmer.

Paul has trained hundreds of people on Agile/Scrum and related topics and regularly presents to various audiences. Paul is a Scrum.org certified Scrum trainer.

Having introduced Scrum in multiple organizations, Paul knows about the pitfalls along the way and the hard work required. More importantly, Paul knows the rewards when you persevere.
He helps organizations move towards more business agility, and effective product development.


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Jeroen Molenaar

Jeroen Molenaar

Website: http://www.j-mo.nl

Twitter: @mc_raze

Change Agent, Agile organization coach, Coach in marketing and business context,
Agile / Scrum coach in enterprises or transitions, management agile coach

I am an eager and result driven Agile coach / Change agent with a background in webdevelopment and architecture. I build an extensive knowledge and experience in the Scrum framework and Agile mindset and am a pragmatic, hands-on, yet a creative solution solver. In the agile coaching role I try to motivate the organization (management as well as teams), enabling everyone to excel in their own specific discipline.
Besides that I love to get the organization in a vibe where we can create small agile speedboats from the big oil-tanker boats; get the entrepreneurial skills and behavior back to the enterprise. Create and measure proper value, create a learning/improving/innovating organization and in the end; do some epic shit together.

I build a broad experience as a Scrum Master / Agile coach and have experienced the ups and downs every project faces in management as well as hands-on roles. This enables me to quickly determine, select, solve and master issues on new projects. I am a very pragmatic focused Agile (management) coach, achieving results in accordance with your needs. The building up a broad experience in the technical environments and a considerable amount of mobile and marketing experience and knowledge, shows my eagerness to keep up with the latest trends.

Presented at:
Scrum gathering 2012 - Atlanta
Agile 2014 - Orlando


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Alexander Helleboogh

Alexander Helleboogh

Website: https://www.linkedin.com/in/alexanderhelleboogh

Twitter: @lexhelleboogh

Alexander has a passion for building software systems and for practices that improve software quality. He believes that the main challenges for building great software systems are typically not in technology, but in fostering collaboration between people. Alexander is convinced that learning and sharing experiences is key to success, so next to consulting, he invests systematically in attending/speaking on conferences and attending/providing courses.


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Johan Tré

Johan Tré

Website: http://co-learning.be

Twitter: @johan_tre

Being in many organizations as a technical and organizational player Johan learned the values of strategic tools and methods within software land.
Holding this in the light of an agile, holistic, complexity vision fuels these recurring values with their contribution as fundamental bricks to build successful organizations.
It is envisioning the gravity field of these building blocks and the ability to pass that on to others that offers the most direct path to insight.
The need for passing on these insights for the benefit of efficiency became passion.

Simply because helping people to become autonomously self-improving is what matters.


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Olivier Azeau

Olivier Azeau

Website: http://agilitateur.azeau.com/

Twitter: @oaz

Software Craftsman
Team Lead at Varian Medical Systems
Co-founder of the agile community in Toulouse, France


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Els De Geyter

Els De Geyter

Website: https://be.linkedin.com/in/elsdegeyter

Twitter: @humanreef

Organizational ecologist and Agile coach - Human Reef

Helping organizations to reinvent themselves to become more agile, self-managing and purpose serving.

Lecturer Computer science - Hogeschool Gent

Process and project management


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Jan De Baere

From management point of view we are making the change from “managing a pair of hands” towards “creating something together”. Leaving the industrial revolution behind us and creating companies where not mass production but adding value is key. Helping companies making that change that’s what I do.


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Gertjan Deserrano

Gertjan Deserrano

Twitter: @GertjanDes

Gertjan Deserrano is an Agile coach with an analytical view on improving processes and guiding teams towards an open mindset. The past 10 years he worked as a back office agent, functional analyst, ScrumMaster, team lead and Agile Coach within Telecommunication at Telenet, Warehouse management solutions at Nike, Finance sector at Argenta and ING for Cegeka. The last 4 years of his career Gertjan has focused on helping Lean and Agile transformations. First on team level as a Change agent and ScrumMaster, later on project and organizational level as an Agile coach. Currently he is assisting ING Belgium as Agile Coach in its Agile Transformation.


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Stefano Leli

Stefano Leli

Website: http://www.agilereloaded.it

Twitter: @sleli

Stefano is a consultant with over 15 years of experience in IT industry and nowadays he works as agile coach and trainer. In 2014 he co-founded Agile Reloaded, the Italian Agile coaching company.

Stefano is passionate about software development ever since he was a child and he has been dealing with Agile since 2003 when he heard about Agile Manifesto and started to practice XP. Since then his approach to software development radically changed.


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Antonio Carpentieri

Antonio Carpentieri

Website: http://acarpe.wordpress.com

Twitter: @acarpe

Passionate about software development, has started focusing on improvements from the very beginning in 1998.
In 2005 eXtreme Programming has slapped in his face the truth and everything changed from that moment.

I work as agile coach, trainer, mentor and developer :) in different companies Agile Reloaded, Lastminute.com and MamaClean.


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Jenni Jepsen

Website: http://www.goagile.dk

Twitter: @jennindk

Jenni Jepsen is a partner at goAgile, a Denmark-based Agile consulting firm, where her focus in on helping people deliver value faster and create lasting change. By getting to the core of WHY Agile works and helping people thrive through change, organizations become Agile – increasing motivation, effectiveness and transparency.

Jenni has extensive experience in change leadership and communications, and integrates NeuroLeadership concepts into her coaching, training and sparring with leaders at every level. She consults and speaks worldwide about leadership, teams, and how to make Agile work.


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Ole Jepsen

Ole is the founder of goAgile and a highly esteemed Agile facilitator and mentor for organizations looking to lead change. Using his expertise in Agile methodologies, Ole shows how gaining varying perspectives and sharing experiences brings about the best ideas that can be used throughout the organization.

Ole is a founder of the Agile Leadership Network (ALN), having started the “Learning and Recognition” Committee—working on defining and implementing a three-level certification program for great Agile Project Leaders. Ole is the founder and leader of the Danish Agile User Group – and he is active in the international agile community, speaking at conferences and consulting worldwide. Ole is also a Certified StrategicPlay® Facilitator with LEGO® SERIOUS PLAY™.


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Ron Eringa

Ron Eringa

Twitter: @roneringa

In his daily job Ron Eringa is an Agile coach, working at Prowareness.
Since he started his career in 2000 he has encountered lots of softare projects, struggling with traditional development methodologies, having forgotten how beautifull it is and how creative it can be to develop software.
However in 2004 he also encountered projects working with Scrum & Agile and he saw that teams rediscovered that original spark that made them become good software developers.

In the last few years Ron has been providing Agile workshops and coaching Agile teams while also participating as a Scrum master, Product Owner and Developer himself. Ron is an enthousiastic speaker, who enjoys to share knowledge and work with empowered teams.

In his private life, Ron is a husband and father of 2 daughters. His hobbies are running, skiing, photography and reading.


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Martijn Dehing

Martijn Dehing

Website: https://nl.linkedin.com/in/martijndehing

Twitter: @martijndehing

Martijn is an Agile Coach working for Prowareness. In his day-today life he supports teams, Scrum Masters, Product Owners and organizations to create the best possible value for their customers.


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Jurgen De Smet

Jurgen De Smet

Website: http://www.co-learning.be

Twitter: @JurgenLACoach

Jurgen De Smet was a guiding hand in one of the largest Agile transitions in EU Healthcare. A master of game techniques for serious enterprise, he has taken companies in some of the most risk-averse, regulated industries and made them rock star achievers of sustainable innovation.

His Belgium-based company Co-Learning supports senior and middle management and entrepreneurs in building and sustaining learning organizations. Known as tough, knowledgeable, persistent and energizing, he is a driver of Gamestorming across Europe, a Innovation Games Qualified Instructor, and the first to implement Luke Hohmann’s concepts for citizen participation in Budget Games outside the United States.

Jurgen is a Certified LeSS (Large-Scale Scrum) Trainer, Licensed Management 3.0 trainer, the author of "Budgetspelen: Inwoners bepalen het beleid!" and "The Effective Use of Gamification Techniques in the Practical World", co-author of "Personal Kanban in a nutshell: The practical guide to personal happiness" and a leader in regional and global communities of practice that keep him freestyling with the best.


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Nelis Boucké

Website: http://www.co-learning.be

Twitter: @nelisboucke

Nelis is a consult with a passion for building software systems and for practices that improve software quality. Most of what he does starts form the observation that the main challenges for great software are typically not in technology, but in fostering collaboration between people. This means that learning and sharing is key to success, both technically as in working with people.


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Rob Smorenburg

Rob Smorenburg

Website: http://www.itlead.nl/

Rob is an independent trainer, coach and consultant who helps teams reach their next level in software engineering and personal development.

Many can write software, few master the art of engineering software. Rob is a software engineer, but does not consider himself a master. More a lifelong learner. By sharing knowledge he hopes to receive knowledge that will bring him one step closer to mastery.

PS.: At 6:00 am on a Saturday morning he might be cleaning legacy code and reducing technical debt. Well, nobody is perfect.


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Marc Evers

Marc Evers

Website: http://www.qwan.eu

Twitter: @marcevers

Marc works as an independent coach, trainer and consultant in the field of (agile) software development and software processes. Marc develops true learning organizations that focus on continuous reflection and improvement: apply, inspect, adapt.

Marc organizes workshops and conferences on agile and lean software development, extreme programming, systems thinking, theory of constraints, and effective communication. Marc is co-founder of the Agile Open and XP Days Benelux conferences.

He knows how to combine his real-world experience with knowledge that is out there to create novel solutions. He likes to add games to highly-rated workshops, so participants have fun and learn from experience.


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Wim Heemskerk

Wim Heemskerk

Website: http://wimheemskerk.com

Twitter: @WimHeemskerk

Wim Heemskerk helps teams to be agile in their practices. He is an Agilist, a software craftsman, and a Stoosian. As a hands-on change agent, he stimulates the alignment of process, technology and organisation. Wim connects the dots to translate complementary models and their principles to day to day actions. He works to create lasting change, the kind people say they created and wanted themselves. He supports others on their quests for agility, leadership, great software and test automation that actually pays off.


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Dirk Mulder

Dirk Mulder

Website: http://www.ultimatehost.nl

Dirk Mulder CPCC is a trainer and a certified Co-active coach and ORSC-teamcoach. He has extensive experience in organizational change management, training and coaching. He worked in (international) consulting for over 30 years. He started in ICT development, moved to Educational Services and has been working in Consulting Services for the last 20 years. He acted as a change manager for companies both in profit as in non-profit. Dirk is passionate and has the ability to inspire, connect and motivate people. In his work he is energetic and bold, but also patient and reflective if necessary. He has excellent communication, coaching and change management skills. Dirk is devoted to coaching and training individuals and teams in their development.


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Nicole Belilos

Nicole Belilos

Website: http://www.xebia.com/agile

Twitter: @nicolebelilos

Nicole Belilos helps organizations, teams and individuals on their journey to Agility. She is an experienced change agent, has strong communication and interpersonal skills, and is appreciated for her hands-on, no-nonsense approach.

Nicole started her career as a C-programmer in the waterfall world. She was introduced to Agile in 2005 and has been an enthusiastic adept ever since. She likes to focus on the human side of Agile, believing that communication and teamwork are key factors for business success. Therefore she is fascinated by the way gender and culture affect the way we interact.

Nicole believes in education and learning. Her lectures and workshops are always highly interactive, spiced with games, role playing, improv theater, group interaction and reflection.

Nicole contributes actively to the Agile community and is an appreciated speaker at Agile conferences.


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Mary Beijleveld

Website: http://www.abc-thinkbig.com

Twitter: @ladybeetle

Welcome guest (and sometimes speaker) at any agile conference in the Netherlands
Co-organizer of all agile coach camps thus far in NL. Contributing to many agile communities: NLscrum, AgileHolland, boardmember Agile Consortium NL and previously organizer, blogger, webmaster & treasurer for networkgroup 'womenincharge'
Always into lending a hand to cocreate awesome workshops and sessions together.

Until end of august working at a large Dutch governmental organization: SVB Sociale verzekeringsbank as a business architect & organizational agile coach. Taking up her drive, patience, understanding & perceverance in teaching & helping teams to become (more) agile.
From September 1st, 2015 working solely as agile coach and trainer for VX Company in Baarn NL.


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Participants

Jan
Jan

Jan has been working as a programmer for 5 years now. Jan loves to program. He knows a lot of languages, and a lot of tools. At work, he he is not always happy because the circumstances often force him to deliver the quality he knows he can reach. Jan explores new technologies and trends on the internet and in books and magazines. At night Jan contributes to an open source project together with 10 other guys, from all over the world. That's where he heard about agile methodologies. In the open source group, he is used to work with unit tests, but he hopes to get some real in-depth tips and tricks from experts at the XP Days conference. He is also interested to learn about the latest trends for continuous intergration tools and test automation.

Meet Jan at the following sessions

Marieke
Marieke

Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis. Several months ago, her team had an introductory training on extreme programming and scrum. Some of the ideas she learned about seemed interesting enough, but she is not sure if this methodology is applicable in their particular situation. After the course, some of her colleagues started to write unit tests, but there still are only a few, and they are not run very often, as far as Marieke can see. They also started to do a daily standup meeting, because according to the trainers that is a tool to enhance communication within the team. But these meetings are rather boring, and they tend to take 1/2 hour, every day. Team members are grumbling about wasting their time.

Marieke started to think all this agile stuff is only an unusable hype. But then she heard about XP Days, and she thought "well, let's give it another chance, if 150 people go to this conference, for 11 years in a row now, maybe there is more to it". She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have applied these techniques, which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.

Meet Marieke at the following sessions

Leo
Leo

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. Over the years, Leo has been working as a developer, as a project lead, as a tester, as an analyst, as a manager, and as a consultant. He knows from experience that everything comes back, if you only wait a few years. He has learned that the same problems and the same solutions have been invented and re-invented a hundred times in computer science. He has lived through the rise and fall of uncountable new technologies and methodogies. All of them brand new, all of them the one and only forever best way to make software. Leo wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.

Meet Leo at the following sessions

Bram
Bram

Bram has never missed an XP Day. Well, to be correct, he has never missed a Benelux XP Day. He has been to several other XP Days in Germany, London, Paris, and in Italy, and also attended quite a few bigger agile and other conferences. Bram likes he XP Days, because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.

Meet Bram at the following sessions

Philippe
Philippe

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He has never heard about this agile stuff. He doesn't know what it is, or what it can be used for. He guesses it is something his boss wants to buy. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.

mmm I think maybe it is not very useful for Philippe to come to the XP Days? -Vera

Why not? Let Philippe come, let him relax and have a beer and dinner with agile people. He might even attend some presentations. And, once he's relaxed, who knows what could happen? --Pascal

Meet Philippe at the following sessions

Georges
Georges

Georges is a project manager. His life is filled with stress, deadlines, difficult programmers, unhappy customers and demanding bosses. Sometimes he wonders if he's chosen the right career.

Lately, Georges has been hearing more and more about agile methods. Some of his ex-colleagues have converted from project management to agile coaching. They tell him tales of vibrant, exciting, fun projects where customers and developers live in perfect harmony. That can't be true. They must be exaggerating. Or are they....?

Meet Georges at the following sessions

Vincent
Vincent

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. His teams don't do too badly. Some projects are allright; some don't fully satisfy their users. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. So, Vincent looks around for solutions that might help him to create and implement the plan. He has looked at a lot of things: processes, tools, consultants... He's heard that some other companies (even some reputable companies) have had success with "agile" methods, so he comes to the XP Day to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him. He doesn't know what to expect. Hippy surfer dudes? 18 year old wizz kids with piercings? Greybearded hackers? Oh well... What does he have to lose?

Meet Vincent at the following sessions

Joke
Joke

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke understands her customers needs, she has lots of ideas for new features that would enhance the product. She knows that this product really enhances its user's lives. That's one of the reasons her company is so succesful. But they have trouble keeping up with customer demand. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. If only she and the development team could work together more efficiently, they could make this product make more of a difference. Maybe this "agile" stuff can help? How does product management work in agile projects? Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.

Meet Joke at the following sessions

Hank
Hank

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. Appalled and bemused by the shocking waste of time, money, and people, he does his best to bring the joy back in the life of those around him by introducing agile methodologies wherever he sees the opportunity. Hank comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.

Meet Hank at the following sessions

Ellen
Ellen

Ellen is an agile coach. She's been using agile methods for a few years now. XP, SCRUM, Lean... it doesn't matter much to her. She's more interested in doing things that matter to deliver value for her customers. She wants to work with a happy team, doing meaningful work.

Ellen wants to learn new ideas and share experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.

Meet Ellen at the following sessions